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Maryland 

HV 

6793 

,H3S74 

1981 

Folio 



981 



- / 



CRIME 



IN MARYLAND 




J/iA' 8? PFO'n 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 



IN MEMORIAM 



Members of the Criminal Records-Central Repository 
express their sympathy to the family of the two Maryland law 
enforcement officers who were killed in the line of duty in 
1981 . 

PHILIP C. METZ 



Police Officer 
Montgomery County Police Department 



RONALD TRACEY 



Pol ice Officer 
Baltimore City Police Department 




STATE OF MARYLAND 



UNIFORM CRIME REPORTS 



v^v^ 



HARRY R. HUGHES GOVERNOR 



THOMAS W. SCHMIDT 

SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF 

PUBLIC SAFETY AND CORRECTIONAL 

SERVICES 



W.T. TRAVERS JR. 



SUPERINTENDENT, MARYLAND 
STATE POLICE 



CRIMINAL RECORDS 
CENTRAL REPOSITORY 



DIRECTOR 
LAMONT EDWARDS 

UNIFORM CRIME REPORTING SECTION 

EDGAR WHITEMAN ADMINISTRATIVE SPECIALIST 



FIELD LIAISON 
VICTOR J. KONSAVAGE ROBERT J. SPANGLER 



STAFF 



M. ANTOINETTE COMFORT 
DENISE E. SMITH 
BARBARA JACOBS 
ANN LEVIN 
ELEANOR D. MERCER 
PHYLLIS SARKIN 

BEATRICE SHAPIRO 



COLONEL W T TRAVERS, JR 
SUPE RINTENDENT 




PIKESVILLE. MARYLAND 21208 
(30I) 486 3IOI 



MARYLAND STATE POLICE 

September 15, 1982 



Honorable Harry Hughes 
Governor of Maryland 
State House 
Annapolis, Maryland 21404 

Dear Governor Hughes: 

Pursuant to Article 88B, Sections 9 and 10, of the Annota- 
ted Code of Maryland, the Maryland State Police respectfully submits 
the 1981 Uniform Crime Report for your information and review. 

The information presented here represents the seventh annual 
report produced by the Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program, The 
statistics presented were compiled from monthly reports submitted to 
Criminal Records-Central Repository by law enforcement agencies through- 
out Maryland. Every effort has been made to verify the accuracy and 
completeness of the published information. 

This information is presented with the hope that it will be 
of valuable assistance to law enforcement personnel and members of the 
Executive and Legislative branches of government. It should be help- 
ful in planning programs and legislation to combat criminal activity 
in Maryland. 

This report is dedicated to the public officials and law 
enforcement officers who have cooperated in the establishment and 
operation of the Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program. Their 
diligence and interest have made this report possible. 



Sincerely, 



Superintendent 






Ham lEnforrrmrnt (toht nf 1Etl|irB 

Ab a ICam lEnfarrpmrnt Wititn, -y funJa^.niJ dut^ i, u 

ierve mannina; to iafe^uara lived ana properlu; lo protect tne innocent aaaindt 
deception, tne wean aqainit oppreiiion or intimidation^ and tne peaceful 
aaainil violence or disorder; and to reipecl the i^onititutionat rianti of ail 
men to lioertu, eaualitu and justice. 



lain coura- 



Jl tUtii keep mu private life uniullied ai an example to all; maint 
aeoui calm in tne face of danaer, scorn, or ridicule; develop ieif -restraint; and 
oe constantlu mindful of the welfare of others, ^^onest in thouaht and deed 
in ooth mu personal and of ficial life, .2r will oe exemplaru in ooeuina the laws 
Of the land and the reaulations of mu department. Vwhatever ^ see or hear of 
a confidential nature or that is confided to me in mu off icial capacity will he 
kept ever Secret unless revelation is necessary in the performance of mu dutu. 

11 tUtil never act off-iciouslu or perwnit personal feelinas, prejudices, anitnos- 
ilies or friendships to influence mu decisions. VUith no compromise for crinte 
and with relentless prosecution of- criminals, .^ will enforce the law courteouslu 
and appropriatelu without fear or favor, malice or ill will, never entplouina 
try force or violence and never acceptina aratuifiei. 



unnecessary force or vu 



It r^rOQtltZF the badge of my **n^''' "^ ** Symbol t*f public faith, and 
.y accept it as a public trust to be held so lona as ^ am true to the ethics of 
the police Service. .^ will constantlu strive to achieve these objectives and ideals, 
dedicating muSelf hefore \jod to my chosen profession . . . law enforcement. 



IV 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENT 



The Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services 
acknowledges the support made available from the Law Enforcement 
Assistance Administration, obtained through the Governor's Commission 
on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, which provided 
the funds to establish and operate the Maryland Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Program and make this seventh Annual Report possible 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Letter of Transmittal iii 

Law Enforcement Code of Ethics iv 

Acknowledgement v 

Introduction 3 

Classification of Offenses 11 

Crime Factors 19 

Crime Index 21 

Maryl and Offense Data 25 

Crime Index Offenses 27 

Murder 37 

Rape 43 

Robbery 49 

Aggravated Assaul t 55 

Breaking or Entering 61 

Larceny 67 

Motor Vehicle Theft 73 

Arson 79 

Index Offense Data 85 

Municipality Crime Rates 121 

Maryland Arrest Data 129 

Violent Crime 131 

Property Crime 1 32 

Drug Abuse Violation Arrests 132 

Gambl i ng Arrests 1 32 

Law Enforcement Employee Data 143 

Law Enforcement Officers Killed 145 

Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted 147 

Law Enforcement Employee Data 163 



VI 



LIST OF TABLES AND CHARTS 



Crime Index for Maryland 1 

Crime Trends for Maryland 2 

Maryl and UCR System Fl ow 9 

Crime Index Offenses-Volume by Month 30 

Violent Crime- Volume by Month 31 

Property Crime-Vol ume by Month 32 

Clearance Rates 33 

Stolen Property-Analysis of Value Stolen & Recovered 34 

Value of Property Stolen-Percent of Volume Recovered 35 

Murder- Vol ume by Month 40 

Murder-Distribution by Circumstances 41 

Murder-Distribution by Type of Weapon 42 

Rape-Vol ume by Month 45 

Rape-Percent Distribution by Nature 47 

Robbery-Vol ume by Month 52 

Robbery- Value of Property Stolen 53 

Robbery-Percent Distribution by Type of Weapon 54 

Aggravated Assault-Volume by Month 58 

Aggravated Assault-Percent Distribution by Type 

of Weapon 59 

Breaking or Entering-Vol ume by Month 64 

Breaking or Entering-Value of Property Stolen 65 

Breaking or Entering-Percent Distribution by Nature 66 

Larceny- Vol ume by Month 70 

Larceny-Distribution by Type 71 

Motor Vehicle Theft-Volume by Month 76 

Motor Vehicle Theft-Percent Distribution by Type 77 

Motor Vehicle Theft-Percent of Value Recovered 78 

Arson-Vol ume by Month 82 

Arson-Distribution by Type of Property 83 

Maryland UCR Crime Index Report by Region, County, 

& Agency 88 

Municipality Crime Index 122 

Arrests- Juvenile 134 

Arrests- Adul t 1 35 

Arrests-Adult vs. Juveniles 136 

Arrests-Drug Abuse Violations-Percent Distribution 

by Type 137 

Arrests-Gambling Violations-Percent Distribution 

by Type 1 38 

Arrests-Sex & Race of Persons Arrested 139 

Arrests-Age of Persons Arrested 140 

Maryland Arrest Report by Region, County & Agency (See Supplemental Report) 

Police Assaul ted-Percent Distribution by Type of Weapon... 148 



VI 1 



Police Assaul ted-Percent Distribution by Type of 

Activity 149 

Police Assaul ted-Percent Distribution of Injuries 

vs. Non-Injuries 150 

Police Assaul ted-Percent Distribution by Time of Day .... 151 

Law Enforcement Officers Assaulted by Region, County, 

& Agency ... 152 

Law Enforcement Employee Rates by Region & County 165 

Law Enforcement Employee Data by Region, County, 

& Agency 166 



Vll 1 



CRIME INDEX FOR MARYLAND 





NUMBER OF 


RATE PER 






OFFENSES 


INDEX 


100,000 


PERCENT 


PERCENT 




OFFENSES 


INHABITANTS 


DISTRIBUTION 


CLEARED 


MURDER 


422 


9.9 


.2 


81 


FORCIBLE RAPE 


1,663 


*78.1 


.6 


58 


Rape by Force 


1,297 








Assault to Rape-Attempts 


366 








ROBBERY 


18,095 


424.7 


6.5 


23 


Firearm 


7,998 








Knife or Cutting 










Instrument 


1,347 








Other Dangerous Weapon 


1,148 








Strong Arm (Hands, Fists, 










Etc.) 


7,602 








AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 


17,691 


415.2 


6.3 


55 


Firearm 


4,498 








Knife or Cutting 










Instrument 


4,204 








Other Dangerous Weapon 


5,651 








Hands, Fists, Feet, Etc. 


3,338 








BREAKING OR ENTERING 


70,762 


1,660.7 


25.3 


17 


Forcible Entry 


55,362 








Unlawful Entry-No Force 


8,246 








Attempted- Forcible Entry 


7,154 








LARCENY-THEFT 


152,544 


3,580.0 


54.5 


18 


$200 and Over 


45,044 








$50 to $200 


50,761 








Under $50 


56,739 








MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 


18,486 


433.8 


6.6 


17 


Autos 


13,522 








Trucks and Buses 


1,940 








Other Vehicles 


3,024 








TOTAL 


279,663 


6,563.3 


**100.0 


21 



*Rate per 100,000 females. 
**Percent distribution does not add to 100% due to rounding. 



CRIME TRENDS FOR MARYLAND 







NUMBER 


PERCENT 


RATE PER 


PERCENT 


INDEX OFFENSES 


YEAR 


OF 


CHANGE 


100,000 


CHANGE 






OFFENSES 


VOLUME 


INHABITANTS 


RATE 




1977 


333 




8.0 






1978 


338 


+ 2 


8.2 


+ 3 


MURDER 


1979 


406 


+20 


9.8 


+20 




1980 


399 


- 2 


9.5 


- 3 




1981 


422 


+ 6 


9.9 


+ 4 




1977 


1,439 




*69.5 






1978 


1,476 


+ 3 


*71.3 


+ 3 


FORCIBLE RAPE 


1979 


1,628 


+10 


*78.5 


+10 




1980 


1,681 


+ 3 


*80.2 


+ 2 




1981 


1,663 


- 1 


*78.1 


- 3 




1977 


12,088 




292.1 






1978 


12,828 


+ 6 


309.6 


+ 6 


ROBBERY 


1979 


13,745 


+ 7 


331.3 


+ 7 




1980 


16,462 


+20 


392.7 


+19 




1981 


18,095 


+10 


424.7 


+ 8 




1977 


14,856 




358.9 






1978 


15,686 


+ 6 


378.6 


+ 5 


AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 


1979 


17,337 


+11 


417.9 


+10 




1980 


17,182 


- 1 


409.9 


- 2 




1981 


17,691 


+ 3 


415.2 


+ 1 




1977 


57,938 




1,399.8 






1978 


58,901 


+ 2 


1,421.7 


+ 2 


BREAKING OR ENTERING 


1979 


62,657 


+ 6 


1,510.2 


+ 6 




1980 


71,130 


+14 


1,696.8 


+12 




1981 


70,762 


- 1 


1,660.7 


- 2 




1977 


131,516 




3,177.5 






1978 


134,012 


+ 2 


3,234.7 


+ 2 


LARCENY-THEFT 


1979 


145,278 


+ 8 


3,501.5 


+ 8 




1980 


152,089 


+ 5 


3,628.1 


+ 4 




1981 


152,544 


+ .3 


3,580.0 


- 1 




1977 


17,732 




428.4 






1978 


17,599 


- 1 


424.8 


- 1 


MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 


1979 


20,217 


+15 


487.3 


+15 




1980 


18,885 


- 7 


450.5 


- 8 




1981 


18,486 


- 2 


433.8 


- 4 




1977 


235,902 




5,699.5 






1978 


240,840 


+ 2 


5,813.2 


+ 2 


TOTAL 


1979 


261,268 


+ 8 


6,297.2 


+ 8 




1980 


277,828 


+ 6 


6,627.6 


+ 5 




1981 


279,663 


+ 1 


6,563.3 


- 1 



*Based on Rate per 100,000 Females 



INTRODUCTION 



The Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program is one of the 
steps that have been taken in the establishment of an effective State- 
wide Criminal Justice Information System. This particular phase of 
the CJIS is oriented toward law enforcement and has brought about a 
statewide uniform method of collecting crime statistical data, pro- 
ducing a consolidated annual report concerning crime in Maryland, and 
reporting statewide crime statistics from a single agency to the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation. 

National Uniform Crime Reporting Program 

The counterpart of the statewide UCR Program is the National 
UCR Program which is under the direction of the Federal Bureau of In- 
vestigation. This national program is the result of a need for nation- 
wide and uniform compilation of law enforcement statistics. Uniform 
Crime Reports were first collected in 1930 after being developed by 
a committee of the International Association of Chiefs of Police. 

Today the lACP continues to serve in an advisory capacity 
to the FBI in its operation of the program. 

Crime statistics voluntarily submitted by individual law 
enforcement agencies from all fifty states are presented annually in 
the FBI's Uniform Crime Reports Publication entitled "Crime in the 
United States". 

In the last several years the FBI has been actively assist- 
ing individual states in the development of statewide programs of 
law enforcement statistics compatible with the National UCR Program. 
In taking advantage of the invaluable assistance provided, Maryland 
has developed its own statewide program for collection of law en- 
forcement statistics. 

flARYLAND UNIFORM CrIME REPORTING PROGRAM 

The Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program involves the 
uniform compilation, classification, and analysis of crime statistics 
reported by all law enforcement agencies of the state pursuant to 
guides and regulations prescribed by law. 

The responsibility and authority for collection and dissemi- 
nation of UCR data was given to the Maryland Department of Public 
Safety and Correctional Services (State Police) under Article 88B, 
Sections 9 and 10, of the Annotated Code of Maryland. The UCR Program 
became operational January 1, 1975. 



Purpose and Objectives 

In keeping with the recommendation of the President's Com- 
mission on Law Enforcement and the Administration of Justice, the 
Maryland UCR Program was planned for eventual growth into a complete 
and integrated offender based Criminal Justice Information System. 
Under this program, each offender arrested in Maryland will be tracked 
through the entire criminal justice system from time of arrest through 
the courts to the correctional system where his exit (parole, expira- 
tion of sentence, etc.) will be recorded. In this manner, a complete 
"criminal history" on individual offenders will be available for use 
by the police, courts, and correctional agencies in Maryland. In 
addition, statistical data derived from the CJIS Program will provide 
assistance in determining the overall efficiency of the criminal jus- 
tice system in Maryland and will make effective management studies 
possible. 



are: 



The fundamental objectives of the Maryland UCR Program 



1. Inform the governor, legislature, other governmental 
officials, and the public as to the nature of the 
crime problem in Maryland - its magnitude and its 
trends. 

2. Provide law enforcement administrators with criminal 
statistics for administrative and operational use. 

3. Determine who commits crimes by age, sex, race and 
other attributes in order to find the proper focus 
for crime prevention and enforcement. 

4. Provide base data and statistics to measure the 
workload and effectiveness of Maryland's Criminal 
Justice System. 

5. Provide base data and statistics to measure the 
effects of prevention and deterrence programs. 

6. Provide base data and statistics for research to 
improve the efficiency, effectiveness and perfor- 
mance of criminal justice agencies. 

7. Provide base data to assist in the assessment of 
social and other causes of crime for the develop- 
ment of theo'^ies of criminal behavior. 

8. Provide the FBI with complete UCR data to be in- 
cluded in the national crime reports. 



Development 

Effective September, 1972, the first federal grant was 
awarded to the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services 
(State Police) by the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration to 
provide money to initiate a Statewide Uniform Crime Reporting Program 
in Maryland. A committee for the implementation of this Program was 
then established by State Police. 

The committee made studies of the federal program, as well 
as several state UCR Programs, which were operational at that time. 
Forms, tally books, and the Maryland UCR Manual were developed, printed 
and distributed to all contributing agencies. Questionnaires concern- 
ing each law enforcement agency's record keeping systems were distri- 
buted to determine their capability to fully participate in the State 
Program. 

In September, 1974, an additional grant was awarded to the 
Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services (State Police) 
by the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration for the purpose of 
hiring Field Records Representatives to serve as liaison officers 
between the State Program and the contributing law enforcement agen- 
cies. Also, additional clerical support for the State Program was 
provided in the grant. 

During the developmental phase, several workshops were 
held in various parts of the State to present the UCR Program in 
detail to participating agencies. Since that time, supplemental 
workshops have been held as needed. 

During 1975, the first year of operation, the UCR Staff 
concentrated its efforts in assisting requesting law enforcement 
agencies in devising or improving their record keeping systems. 
The UCR Staff continues to keep the agencies trained in UCR and 
to provide assistance where needed. Agencies contributing to the 
UCR Program have increased from 102 agencies in 1975 to 136 in 
1981. The UCR Section collects crime information from these 136 
agencies and publishes quarterly releases reflecting crime trends. 
In addition, this is the seventh annual report produced by the UCR 
Staff containing an in-depth analysis of all information collected 
in the UCR Program. 

During 1981, statistics were collected concerning Battered 
Spouses and a fourth Maryland Battered Spouse Report was produced. 

Reporting Procedures 

Under the Maryland UCR Program, law enforcement agencies 
are required to submit specified Uniform Crime Reports. The necess- 
ary information for each of the required reports is gathered from 
each agency's record of complaints, investigations and arrests. 



For those agencies desiring assistance in developing sound record 
systems, or improving their present system, a copy of the FBI's 
Manual of Police Records has been provided, along with training of 
records personnel by UCR Field Representatives. 

Crime data and information is submitted by state, county, 
and municipal law enforcement agencies on a daily, monthly, and 
annual basis. The daily report consists of the fingerprints of all 
persons arrested, detained, or charged with any crime or offense in 
Maryland. 

On a monthly basis, organized state, municipal, and county 
law enforcement agencies report the number of offenses known to them 
in the following crime categories: 

(1) Criminal Homicide 

(2) Forcible Rape 

(3) Robbery 

(4) Assault 

(5) Breaking or Entering 

(6) Larceny 

(7) Motor Vehicle Theft 

(8) Arson* 

The count of offenses is taken from the record of complaints 
received by law enforcement agencies from victims, witnesses, other 
sources, or discovered by them during their own operation. Complaints 
determined by subsequent investigation to be unfounded are eliminated 
from the count. The resulting number of "actual offenses known to law 
enforcement agencies" in these crime categories is reported without 
regard to whether anyone is arrested, stolen property is recovered, 
local prosecutive policy, or any other consideration. Reported offen- 
ses are recorded by the municipality and county in which they occur. 
Municipal law enforcement agencies report those crimes which are com- 
mitted within the cities; county law enforcement agencies and state 
police report those crimes which occur in the counties outside the 
city. Law enforcement agencies also report on a monthly basis, supple- 
mental offense information such as the value of property stolen and 
recovered as well as circumstances surrounding homicides and other 
pertinent data. Additional monthly reports of persons arrested are 
submitted. These reports provide information concerning the age, sex 
and race of persons arrested by each individual law enforcement agency. 
Also, a police disposition of all juveniles arrested is collected. 

In addition, police employee data is collected on an annual 
basis. 



Verification Process 

An obvious concern in the collection of crime statistics 
for law enforcement agencies throughout the state is the uniformity 

*Monthly arson reports are submitted for law enforcement agencies by 
the State Fire Marshal's Office and designated county agencies. 



and accuracy of data received. Program aides such as guides and in- 
structions do not necessarily guarantee the accuracy and correctness 
of the reports submitted by the contributors. Additional controls, 
therefore, are necessary. 

Each report received by the UCR Section is recorded, examined 
and verified for mathematical accuracy, and possibly more important, 
for reasonableness. The verification process includes numerous checks 
to ensure the validity of information. The elimination of duplication 
of reporting by individual contributors receives particular attention. 
Minor errors are corrected by telephone contact with the contributors. 
Substantial variations and errors are adjusted through personal con- 
tacts with individual contributing agencies. The personal contacts are 
invaluable to the accuracy and quality of reporting. Field Representa- 
tives are engaged in a constant educational effort, and as such, provide 
a vital link between the UCR Program and the contributor. 

Population Data 

The computation of crime rates as they appear in this report 
by municipality, county, and state are based on 1981 population esti- 
mates provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation through the co- 
operation and assistance of the United States Bureau of Census. 

Monthly and annual Uniform Crime Reports are received from 
136 municipal, county, and state law enforcement agencies in Maryland. 

Limitations of a Uniform Crime Reporting Program 

Information currently collected by the Maryland Program is 
generally the same as that gathered by the National system, and the 
methods of classifying and scoring offenses and arrests are the same. 
This readily enables comparisons with other states and with the nation, 
as a whole. However, there are limitations to the information collec- 
ted which should be clearly understood before any conclusions are drawn 
from the UCR data presented in this report. 

The main goal of the UCR Program is to furnish police adminis- 
trators with a measure of their activities and operational problems as 
indicated by the number of reported offenses, arrests, clearances, and 
the like. 

A first step in the control of crime is to ascertain the 
true dimensions of the problem. However, present statistics as gather- 
ed by the UCR Program measure neither the real incidence of crime nor 
the full amount of economic loss to victims. Information regarding 
number of offenses and clearances is collected only for the eight 
Part I crimes. Value and type of property stolen and recovered data 
is requested only for property stolen in Part I offenses. For Part II 
offenses (except non-aggravated assault), the only information sub- 
mitted is the number of arrests for these crimes according to the age. 



sex, and race of the subject. Consequently, there is no record of the 
actual number of these offenses occurring, nor is there a calculation 
made for property loss, as in cases of vandalism and embezzlement. 

The Crime Index does not explicitly take into account the 
varying degrees of seriousness of its seven components. Each crime 
receives the same weight as it is added to the Index. Consequently, 
an auto theft is counted the same as a murder, and an aggravated 
assault is weighted equally with an attempted breaking or entering. 
Any review of crime must consider the volume, rate, and trend of each 
offense that comprises the Index and the relationship between these 
seven crimes*. 

The Maryland and National Uniform Crime Reporting Programs 
are designed to measure offenses committed and persons arrested, and 
difficulties can arise if this distinction is not kept clearly in 
mind. Crimes relate to events, but arrests relate to persons. Un- 
like traffic violations where there is usually one event, with one 
violation and one offender, a single criminal act can involve several 
crimes, several offenders, and several victims. Relating specific 
crimes to the criminal, or specific offenses to characteristics of 
those arrested, is generally beyond the scope of the present Uniform 
Crime Reporting system. 

Juvenile crime and arrest statistics, because of their 
nature, are another area of misunderstanding. Many juvenile offen- 
ders are handled informally and, as a consequence, inaccurate or 
incomplete recording of the event or action may result. Procedures 
for handling juveniles vary between departments, more so than the 
handling of adult offenders. Furthermore, the degree of juvenile 
involvement in solved offenses is probably seriously misunderstood, 
because juvenile participation in clearances is recorded only when 
juveniles are exclusively involved. When both adults and juveniles 
are subjects in a clearance, the juvenile participation is not re- 
ported. 

The preceding comments should not be viewed as an indict- 
ment of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program which, admittedly, is 
designed for the operational requirements of law enforcement agencies. 
While current methods of gathering and reporting crime and arrest data 
provide a less than complete picture of criminality in our society, 
there is at present no other informational system in general use that 
will more adequately perform this task. 



*Arson is not used at this time in computing the Crime Index. 



8 



MARYLAND UCR SYSTEM FLOW 



Field 
Liaison 
Unit 



Law 
Enforcement 
Agency 



I 



UCR 
Returns 



I 




i 



Verified 




No >^ "^w Yes 

Correct 



National Copy 



Maryland Copy 



Victim 



FBI 



Key Punch 



i 




Hard Copy 
File 



Public/ 
Research 



Criminal 

Justice 

Agencies 



General 
Assembly 



Attorney 
General 



Governor 



CLASSIFICATION OF OFFENSES 



Uniformity in reporting under the Maryland System is based 
upon the proper classification of offenses by police. 

The adoption of the Federal System of Uniform Crime Report- 
ing included the utilization of the offense classifications of that 
system. Law enforcement in this state has made accurate application 
of those classifications in the reports submitted to the Maryland 
Uniform Crime Reporting System. 

Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting 

Offenses in Uniform Crime Reporting are divided into two 
groupings designated as Part I and Part II offenses. Crime Index 
offenses are included among the Part I offenses. Offense and arrest 
information is reported for the Part I offenses on a monthly basis, 
whereas only arrest information is reported for Part II offenses. 

The Part I offenses are as follows: 

1. CRIMINAL HOMICIDE -- (a) Murder and non-negligent 
manslaughter: All willful felonious homicides as 
distinguished from deaths caused by negligence. 
Excludes attempts to kill, assaults to kill, sui- 
cides, accidental deaths, or justifiable homicides. 
Justifiable homicides are limited to: (1) The 
killing of a person by a law enforcement officer 

in line of duty; and (2) The killing of a person 
in the act of committing a felony by a private 
citizen, (b) Manslaughter by negligence: Any 
death which the police investigation established 
was primarily attributable to gross negligence of 
some individual other than the victim. 

2. FORCIBLE RAPE -- The carnal knowledge of a female, 
forcibly and against her will in the categories of 
rape by force, assault to rape, and attempted rape. 
Excludes statutory offenses (no force used - victim 
under age of consent). 

3. ROBBERY -- Stealing or taking anything of value from 
the care, custody, or control of a person by force or 
by violence or by putting in fear, such as strong-arm 
robbery, stickups, armed robbery, assaults to rob, 
and attempts to rob. 

4. AGGRAVATED ASSAULT -- Assault with intent to kill or 
for the purpose of inflicting severe bodily injury 
by shooting, cutting, stabbing, maiming, poisoning, 
scalding, or by the use of acids, explosives, or 
other means. Excludes simple assaults. 



11 



5. BURGLARY - BREAKING OR ENTERING -- Burglary, house- 
breaking, safecracking, or any breaking or unlawful 
entry of a structure with the intent to commit a 
felony or a theft. Includes attempted forcible entry. 

6. LARCENY-THEFT (except motor vehicle theft) -- The un- 
lawful taking, carrying, leading, or riding away of 
property from the possession or constructive possession 
of another. Thefts of bicycles, automobile accessories, 
shoplifting, pocket-picking, or any stealing of property 
or article which is not taken by force and violence or 
by fraud. Excludes embezzlement, "con" games, forgery, 
worthless checks, etc. 

7. MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT -- Unlawful taking or stealing or 
attempted theft of a motor vehicle. A motor vehicle 

is a self-propelled vehicle that travels on the surface 
but not on rails. Specifically excluded from this cate- 
gory are motor boats, construction equipment, airplanes, 
and farming equipment. 

8. ARSON -- Include all arrests for violations of state 
laws and municipal ordinances relating to arson and 
attempted arson. Include: any willful or malicious 
burning or attempts to burn, with or without intent 
to defraud, a dwelling house, church, college, jail, 
meeting house, public building or any building, ship 
or other vessel, motor vehicle or aircraft; contents 
of building, personal property of another, goods or 
chattels, crops, trees, fences, gates, grain, vege- 
table products, lumber, woods, cranberry bogs, marshes, 
meadows, etc. 

If personal injury results from the arson, the situa- 
tion would be classified as aggravated assault. In 
the event a death results from arson, the incident 
would be classified as murder. 

The Part II Offenses are as follows: 

9. OTHER ASSAULTS -- Assaults and attempted assaults which 
do not result in serious or aggravated injury to the 
victim are included as other assaults. Examples of 
local jurisdiction offense titles which would be in- 
cluded in "other assaults" are: Simple assault, minor 
assault, assault and battery, injury by culpable negli- 
gence, resisting or obstructing an officer, intimidation, 
coercion, hazing, attempts to commit above. 



12 



10. FORGERY AND COUNTERFEITING -- In this class are placed 
all offenses dealing with the making, altering, utter- 
ing or possessing, with intent to defraud, anything 
false in the semblance of that which is true. 

Include: Altering or forging public and other records. 
Making, altering, forging, or counterfeiting bills, notes, 
drafts, tickets, checks, 'credit cards, etc. Forging 
wills, deeds, notes, bonds, seals, trade-marks, etc. 

Counterfeiting coins, plates, bank notes, checks, etc. 

Possessing or uttering forged or counterfeited instru- 
ments. 

Erasures. 

Signing the name of another or fictitious person with 
intent to defraud. 

Using forged labels. 

Possession, manufacture, etc., of counterfeiting appara- 
tus. 

Selling goods with altered, forged, or counterfeited 
trade-marks. 

All attempts to commit the above. 

11. FRAUD -- Fraudulent conversion and obtaining money or 
property by false pretenses. Includes bad checks, 
confidence games, etc., except forgeries and counter- 
feiting. 

12. EMBEZZLEMENT -- Misappropriation or misapplication of 
money or property entrusted to one's care, custody, or 
control . 

13. STOLEN PROPERTY; BUYING, RECEIVING, POSSESSING — In- 
clude in this class all offenses of buying, receiving, 
and possessing stolen property, as well as all attempts 
to commit any of these offenses. 

14. VANDALISM -- Vandalism consists of the willful or mali- 
cious destruction, injury, disfigurement, or defacement 
of any public or private property, real or personal, 
without consent of the owner or person having custody or 
control, by cutting, tearing, breaking, marking, paint- 
ing, drawing, covering with filth, or any other such 
means as may be specified by local law. This offense 
covers a wide range of malicious behavior directed at 
property, such as: cutting auto tires, drawing obscene 



13 



pictures on public restroom walls, smashing windows, 
destroying school records, tipping over gravestones, 
defacing library books, etc. Count all arrests for 
the above, including attempts. 

15. WEAPONS; CARRYING, POSSESSING, ETC. -- This class 
deals with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, 
such as: 

Manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons. 

Carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly. 

Using, manufacturing, etc., silencers. 

Furnishing deadly weapons to minors. 

Aliens possessing deadly weapons. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

16. PROSTITUTION AND COMMERCIALIZED VICE -- Include in 
this class the sex offenses of a commercialized 
nature, such as: 

Prostitution. 

Keeping bawdy house, disorderly house, or house of 
i 1 1 fame . 

Pandering, procuring, transporting, or detaining 
women for immoral purposes, etc. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

17. SEX OFFENSES -- (Except forcible rape and prostitution 
and commercialized vice.) Include offenses against 
chastity, common decency, morals, and the like, such 
as: 

Adultery and fornication. 

Buggery. 

Incest. 

Indecent exposure. 

Indecent liberties. 

Intercourse with an insane, epileptic, or venerally 
diseased person. 



14 



Seduction. 

Sodomy or crime against nature. 

Statutory rape (no force). 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

18. DRUG ABUSE LAWS -- Drug abuse law arrests are re- 
quested on the basis of the narcotics used. Make 
the following subdivisions of drug abuse law arrests: 

Include all arrests for violations of state and local 
laws, specifically those relating to the unlawful 
possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing, and 
making of narcotic drugs. 

a. Opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, 
heroin, codeine). 

b. Marijuana. 

c. Synthetic narcotics--manufactured narcotics which 
can cause true drug addiction (demerol , metha- 
dones). 

d. Dangerous nonnarcotic drugs (barbiturates, benze- 
drine). 

19. GAMBLING -- All charges which relate to promoting, 
permitting, or engaging in gambling are included in 
this category. To provide a more refined collection 
of gambling arrests, the following breakdown of gamb- 
ling arrests should be furnished. 

a. Bookmaking (horse and sport book). 

b. Numbers and lottery. 

c. All other. 

20. OFFENSES AGAINST THE FAMILY AND CHILDREN -- Include 
here all charges of nonsupport and neglect or abuse 
of family and children, such as: 

Desertion, abandonment, or nonsupport of wife or child. 

Neglect or abuse of child. (If injury is serious, 
score as aggravated assault.) 

Nonpayment of alimony. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 



15 



21. DRIVING UNDER THE INFLUENCE -- This class is limited 
to the driving or operating of any vehicle or common 
carrier while drunk or under the influence of liquor 
or narcotics. Include: 

Operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated. 

Operating an engine, train, streetcar, boat, etc., 
while intoxicated. 

22. LIQUOR LAWS -- With the exception of "drunkenness" 
(offense #23), and "driving under the influence" 
(offense #21), liquor law violations, state or local, 
are placed in this class. Include: 

Manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possess- 
ing, etc., intoxicating liquor. 

Maintaining unlawful drinking places. 

Advertising and soliciting orders for intoxicating 
1 iquor. 

Bootlegging. 

Operating still . 

Furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person. 

Using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor. 

Drinking on train or public conveyance. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

23. DRUNKENNESS -- Not reported in Maryland. 

24. DISORDERLY CONDUCT -- In this class are placed all 
charges of committing a breach of the peace. 
Include: 

Affray. 

Unlawful assembly. 

Disturbing the peace. 

Disturbing meetings. 

Disorderly conduct in state institutions, at court, 
at fairs, on trains, or public conveyances, etc. 

Disguised and masked persons; night riders. 



16 



Blasphemy, profanity, and obscene language. 

Desecrating flag. 

Refusing to assist an officer. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

25. VAGRANCY -- Include: 
Vagrancy. 
Begging. 

Loitering (persons 18 and over). 

26. ALL OTHER OFFENSES -- Include in this class ewery other 
state or local offense not included in offenses 1 to 25, 
such as: 

Admitting minors to improper places. 

Abduction and compelling to marry. 

Abortion (death resulting from abortion is a homicide, 
offense class la). 

Bigamy and polygamy. 

Blackmail and extortion. 

Bribery. 

Combination in restraint of trade; trusts, monopolies. 

Contempt of court. 

Criminal anarchism. 

Criminal syndicalism. 

Discrimination; unfair competition. 

Kidnapping. 

Marriage within prohibited degrees. 

Offenses contributing to juvenile delinquency (except 
as provided for in offenses 1 to 28 inclusive), such 
as employment of children in immoral vocations or 
practices, admitting minors to improper place, etc. 



17 



Perjury and subornation of perjury. 

Possession, repair, manufacture, etc., of burglar's 
tool s. 

Possession or sale of obscene literature, pictures, etc. 

Public nuisances. 

Riot and rout. 

Trespass. 

Unlawfully bringing weapons into prisons or hospitals. 

Unlawfully bringing drugs or liquor into state prisons, 
hospitals, etc.; furnishing to convicts. 

Unlawful disinterment of the dead and violation of 
sepulture. 

Unlawful use, possession, etc., of explosives. 

Violation of state regulatory laws and municipal 
ordinances (this does not include those offenses or 
regulations which belong in the above classes). 

Violation of quarantine. 

All offenses not otherwise classified. 

All attempts to commit any of the above. 

27. SUSPICION -- While "suspicion" is not an offense, it 
is the ground for many arrests in those jurisdictions 
where the law permits. After examination by the police, 
the prisoner is either formally charged or released. 
Those formally charged are entered in one of the Part I 
or II offense classes. This class is limited to "sus- 
picion" arrests where persons arrested are released by 
the police. 

28. CURFEW AND LOITERING LAWS -- (JUVENILES) -- Count all 
arrests made by your department for violation of local 
curfew or loitering ordinances where such laws exist. 

29. RUN-AWAY (JUVENILES) -- For the purpose of Uniform Crime 
Reporting Program, report in this category apprehensions 
for protective custody as defined by your local statute. 
Count arrests made by other jurisdictions of run-aways 
from your jurisdiction. Do not include protective cus- 
tody actions with respect to run-aways you take for 
other jurisdictions. 



18 



CRIME FACTORS 



statistics gathered under the Uniform Crime Reporting 
Program are submitted by the law enforcement agencies of Maryland 
and project a statewide view of crime. Awareness of the presence 
of certain crime factors, which may influence the resulting volume 
and type of statistics presented, is necessary if fair and equitable 
conclusions are to be drawn. These crime influencing factors are 
present, to some degree, in e\jery community and their presence 
affects, in varying degrees, the crime experience of that community. 
Attempts at comparison of crime figures between communities should 
not be made without first considering the individual factors present 
in each community. 

Crime, as an outgrowth of society, remains a social prob- 
lem of grave concern and the police are limited in their role to its 
suppression and detection. As stated by the President's Commission 
on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice in their 
report "The Challenge of Crime in a Free Society" (1967 - Page 92): 

"But the fact that the police deal daily with crime 
does not mean that they have unlimited power to 
prevent it, or reduce it, or deter it. The police 
did not create and cannot resolve the social condi- 
tions that stimulate crime. They did not start and 
cannot stop the convulsive social changes that are 
taking place in America. They do not enact the laws 
that they are required to enforce, nor do they dis- 
pose of the criminals they arrest. The police are 
only one part of the criminal justice system; the 
criminal justice system is only one part of the 
government; and the government is only one part of 
society. Insofar as crime is a social phenomenon, 
crime prevention is the responsibility of ewery part 
of society. The criminal process is limited to case 
by case operations, one criminal or one crime at a 
time." 

Set forth below are some of the conditions which will, by 
type and volume, affect the crime that occurs from place to place: 

Density and size of the community population and the 
metropolitan area of which it is a part. 

Composition of the population with reference particu- 
larly to age, sex and race. 

Economic status of the population. 

Relative stability of population, including commuters, 
seasonal, and other transient types. 



19 



Climate, including seasonal weather conditions. 

Educational, recreational, and religious characteristics. 

Standards governing appointments to the police force. 

Policies of the prosecuting officials and the courts. 

Attitude of the public toward law enforcement problems. 

The administrative and investigative efficiency of the 
local law enforcement agency, including the degree of 
adherence to crime reporting standards. 

Organization and cooperation of adjoining and overlapping 
police jurisdictions. 



20 



CRIME INDEX 



The tabulations presented in the tables, graphs, and charts 
in this publication indicate the volume and distribution of crime in 
Maryland on the basis of a Crime Index. The crime figures are broken 
down by agency, county, regional, and state totals. 

The total number of criminal acts that occur is unknown, but 
those that are reported to law enforcement provide the first means of 
a count. Not all crimes are of sufficient importance to be significant 
in an index; and not all important crimes occur with enough regularity 
to be meaningful in an index. With these considerations in mind, the 
crimes below were selected as a group to furnish a convenient measure 
of the crime problem: 

1. Murder and Nonnegligent Manslaughter 

2. Forcible Rape 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated Assault 

5. Breaking or Entering 

6. Larceny-Theft 

7. Motor Vehicle Theft 

8. Arson* 

These offenses were selected because they are serious either by nature 
or frequency of occurrence. 

The crime counts set forth in this publication are actual 
offenses established by police investigation. When police receive a 
complaint of a crime and the follow-up investigation discloses no 
crime occurred, it is "unfounded". 

In 1981, police investigations "unfounded" 8 percent of the 
complaints concerning Index Offenses, ranging from 1 percent in the 
Aggravated Assault category to 15 percent in the Motor Vehicle Theft 
category. When compared to 1980, there were 1 percent "unfounded" 
in the Aggravated Assault category, and 16 percent in the Motor Ve- 
hicle Theft category. 



Calculation of Rates and Trends 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program provides data for police 
executives to measure local problems. To facilitate this function, it 
is sometimes necessary to convert the data into rates, percentages, or 
trends. Certain guidelines are presented. 

Crime Rates 

One of the most meaningful crime statistics is the Crime 
Rate. This rate is the number of offenses per 100,000 inhabitants. 

*1981 arson statistics are not included in the Crime Index in this 
report. 

21 



This rate can be calculated regardless of the number of inhabitants 
in your city or county. To compute rates, divide your city's popu- 
lation by 100,000 and divide the number of offenses in each class 
by that answer. The answer is the number of offenses in each class 
per 100,000 and is your Crime Rate for that offense. 

Example: 

a. Population for your jurisdiction 75,000 

b. Number of burglaries for your 
jurisdiction for a year 215 

Divide 75,000 by 100,000 = .75 

Divide 215 by .75 = 286.7 

Your burglary rate: 286.7 per 100,000 inhabitants 

The number of .75 can now be divided into your totals in any offense 
class to produce a Crime Rate for that offense. 

This same computation can be completed to give you arrest rates per 
100,000 inhabitants. 

Clearance Rates 

The percentage of crimes cleared by arrest is obtained by 
dividing the number of offenses cleared by the number of actual 
offenses. This answer is then multiplied by 100. An example of 
this calculation is: 

a. Number of clearances in robbery 38 

b. Number of actual robberies 72 

Divide 38 by 72 = .528 
Multiply: .528 x 100 = 52.8 

Your percentage of clearance in robbery is 52.8%. 



22 



Percent of Change 

The method most commonly used to compare crime statistics 
for the current year with any prior year is the Percent of Change. 
This Percent is calculated by subtracting the prior year's data from 
the current year's data and dividing the resulting figure by the 
prior year's data. The answer is then multiplied by 100, An example 
of this calculation is: 

a. 1981 Robberies 18,095 

b. 1980 Robberies 16,462 



Subtract 16,462 from 18,095 = 1,633 

Divide 1,633 by 16,462 = +.099 

Multiply +.099 x 100 = + 9.9 

Your Percent of Change in Robbery is + 9.9 or 

10 percent when rounded. 



23 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



MARYLAND 
OFFENSE DATA 



CRIME INDEX OFFENSES 



Volume 



A total of 279,663 Crime Index Offenses were reported to 
law enforcement agencies in Maryland during the Calendar Year 1981. 
This represents an increase of 1 percent when compared to the 1980 
data which was comprised of a total of 277,828 Crime Index Offenses. 

The Crime Index Offenses referred to here represent the 
most common problem to law enforcement. They are serious crimes by 
their nature, volume or frequency of occurrence. Basically, they 
can be categorized as Violent Crime, which include Murder, Forcible 
Rape, Robbery, and Aggravated Assault, or as Property Crimes which 
include Breaking or Entering, Larceny and Motor Vehicle Theft. 

An analysis of the total Index by month in 1981 shows that 
August had the highest frequency of occurrence and January had the 
lowest. Compared to 1980, August had the highest frequency and Feb- 
ruary had the lowest. 

Violent Crime 

Violent Crimes involve the element of personal confron- 
tation between the perpetrator and the victim. Because of their 
very nature Violent Crimes are considered more serious than Property 
Crimes. These offenses accounted for 14 percent of the total Crime 
Index for 1981. In 1980 these offenses accounted for 13 percent of 
the total Crime Index. 

Analyzing the Violent Crimes by month reveals August had 
the greatest frequency of occurrence, while February had the lowest, 
the same as in 1980. 



Property Crime 

The number of Property Crimes reported during 1981 was 
more than 6 times greater than the number of Violent Crimes reported. 
As a group. Property Crimes made up 86 percent of the total Crime 
Index. In 1980, Property Crimes made up 87 percent of the total 
Crime Index. 

A monthly analysis showed August had the highest frequency 
of occurrence and January had the lowest. During 1980, August was 
the highest and February was the lowest. 

Rates 

Crime Rates relate the incidence of crime to the resident 
population. Many other factors which may contribute to the volume 



27 



and type of crime in a given jurisdiction are not incorporated here, 
but are shown in the section entitled "Crime Factors". 

In 1981, the Crime Rate for Maryland was 6,563.3 victims 
for eyery 100,000 population. This represents a 1 percent decrease 
in the Crime Rate when compared to 1980 with 6,627.6 victims per 
100,000 population. 

The 1981 Rate for the Violent Crime group was established 
at 888.8 victims per 100,000 inhabitants, a 4 percent increase com- 
pared with 1980, The Property Crime group resulted in a Rate of 
5,674.5 per 100,000 inhabitants. This results in a 2 percent de- 
crease when compared to 1980. 



Clearances 

For Uniform Crime Reporting purposes, a crime is cleared 
when police have identified the offender, have evidence to charge 
him and actually take him into custody. Solutions of crimes are 
also recorded in exceptional instances where some element beyond 
police control precludes formal charges against the offender, such 
as the victim's refusal to prosecute or local prosecution is de- 
clined because the subject is being prosecuted elsewhere for a 
crime committed in another jurisdiction. The arrest of one person 
can clear several crimes or several persons may be arrested in the 
process of solving one crime. 

Maryland law enforcement agencies cleared 21 percent of 
all Index Offenses reported to them in 1981. During 1980, police 
cleared 20 percent of the Index Offenses reported. 

The Violent Crimes recorded a 40 percent clearance rate 
as compared to 1980 with a 41 percent clearance rate. The Property 
Crime group revealed an 18 percent clearance rate in 1981. During 
1980, police cleared 17 percent of the Property Crimes. 

Considering individually the 1981 Violent Crime solution 
rate, it was determined that police were successful in solving 81 
percent of the Murder, 58 percent of the Rapes, 23 percent of the 
Robberies, and 55 percent of the Aggravated Assaults. The Property 
Crime solution rates were 17 percent for Breaking or Entering, 18 
percent for Larceny, and 17 percent for Motor Vehicle Theft. 

The relatively high clearance rate for Violent Crimes as 
compared to non-violent Property Crimes is in part attributable to 
the volume difference between the two. Property Crime volume is 
much greater than that of Violent Crime and police investigation 
of Violent Crime is usually more intense. The element of confron- 
tation between victim and perpetrator, a^^ well as witness identi- 
fication of the perpetrator, also contributes to this higher rate 
of solution. 



28 



Juvenile Clearances 

In 1981, the clearance involvement of those persons under 
the age of 18 represented 27 percent of all cases cleared, compared 
to 29 percent in 1980. 

The juvenile clearances for the Violent Crime category re- 
presented 17 percent of those cases solved, the same as in 1980, with 
7 percent clearances in Murder cases, 7 percent clearances in Rape 
cases, 24 percent clearances in Robbery cases, and 15 percent clear- 
ances in Aggravated Assault cases. 

The Property Crime clearances involving juveniles, repre- 
sented 30 percent of those cases solved, as compared to 33 percent 
in 1980, with 33 percent in Breaking or Entering cases, 29 percent 
in Larceny cases, and 30 percent in Motor Vehicle Theft cases. 



Stolen Property Value 

The total value of Property Stolen during 1981 was 
$164,188,701 which resulted in a 4 percent increase over 1980. 
Recovered Property amounted to $44,382,502 which is 27 percent 
of the total stolen, resulting in a $119,806,199 property loss 
to victims in the State of Maryland during 1981. This property 
loss results in a .4 percent increase when compared to the proper- 
ty loss in 1980. 



29 



CRIME INDEX OFFENSES 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 





^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ Vv A\/ov^::)no 


36,000 - 


^^^^^^^ D I ! . MVcrdyc 


34,000 - 


- 


32,000 - 


- 


30,000 - 


- 


28,000 - 


- 


26,000 - 
24,000 - 
22,000 - 


; ^-^P^oi^ 


20,000 - 


^....y^ 


18,000 - 


-_/^ 


16,000- 


- 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV 



30 



VIOLENT CRIME 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



31 



PROPERTY CRIME 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 




JAN FEB riAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



32 



CLEARANCE RATES 









NUMBER 






RATE 


PERCENT 


OFFENSES 


YEAR 




OF 


NUMBER 


OF 


CHANGE 








OFFENSES 


CLEARED 


CLEARANCE 


OF RATE 


MURDER 




1980 




399 




307 


77 








1981 




422 




342 


81 


+ 5 


FORCIBLE 


RAPE 


1980 


1 


,681 




912 


54 








1981 


1 


,663 




965 


58 


+ 7 


ROBBERY 




1980 


16 


,462 


3 


,843 


23 








1981 


18 


,095 


4 


,150 


23 





AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 


1980 


17 


,182 


9 


,725 


57 








1981 


17 


,691 


9 


,653 


55 


- 4 


BREAKING 


OR ENTERING 


1980 


71 


,130 


12 


,428 


17 








1981 


70 


,762 


12 


,372 


17 





LARCENY-- 


rHEFT 


1980 


152 


,089 


26, 


,729 


18 








1981 


152, 


,544 


27, 


,257 


18 





MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 


1980 


18, 


,885 


2, 


,924 


16 








1981 


18. 


,486 


3. 


,055 


17 


+ 6 


VIOLENT ( 


:rime 


1980 


35. 


,724 


14. 


,787 


41 








1981 


37, 


,871 


15, 


,110 


40 


- 2 


PROPERTY 


CRIME 


1980 


242. 


,104 


42, 


,081 


17 








1981 


241, 


,792 


42, 


,684 


18 


+ 6 


TOTAL 




1980 


277. 


,828 


56, 


,868 


20 








1981 


279, 


,663 


57, 


,794 


21 


+ 5 



33 



STOLEN PROPERTY 



ANALYSIS OF VALUE STOLEN AND RECOVERED 1981 





VALUE OF 


VALUE OF 


PERCENT OF 


TYPE OF PROPERTY 


PROPERTY 


PROPERTY 


VALUE 




STOLEN 


RECOVERED 


RECOVERED 


Currency, Notes, Etc. 


$ 13,874,115 


$ 1,367,902 


10% 


Jewelry and Precious 


37,021,462 


2,618,834 


7% 


Metals 








Clothing and Furs 


4,613,610 


730,692 


16% 


Locally Stolen Motor 


48,161,920 


32,845,038 


68% 


Vehicles 








Office Equipment 


2,012,854 


180,453 


9% 


Televisions, Radios, 


15,708,601 


1,001,755 


6% 


Cameras, Etc. 








Firearms 


2,266,757 


281,595 


12% 


Household Goods 


3,987,702 


351 ,955 


9% 


Consumable Goods 


1,559,022 


281,088 


18% 


Livestock 


161,371 


82,423 


51% 


Miscellaneous 


34,821,287 


4,640,769 


13% 


*TOTAL 


$164,188,701 


$44,382,502 


27% 



♦Breakdown does not equal total due to rounding. 



34 



VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN 



PERCENT OF VOLUME RECOVERED 1981 



73% 




Recovered 
Not Recovered 





5 Yr. 
Total 


1981 


1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


Stolen 


612 

Mill ion 


164 
Million 


158 
Mil 1 ion 


117 
Mill ion 


93 
Mil 1 ion 


80 
Mill ion 


Recovered 


181 
flill ion 


44 
Mill ion 


39 
Mil 1 ion 


40 
Mil 1 ion 


31 
Mill ion 


27 

Mill ion 



35 



MURDER 



I 
I 
I 




MURDER 



Murder is defined as the willful (nonnegl igent) killing of 
one human being by another. As a general rule, any death due to a 
fight, argument, quarrel, assault, or commission of a crime is counted 
as a Murder. This offense is scored on the basis of police investiga- 
tion without regard to the findings of a court or jury or the decision 
of a prosecutor. Assaults to Murder and Attempted Murders are counted 
as Aggravated Assaults. Suicide, accidental deaths and justifiable 
homicides are also excluded. 



Volume 

In 1981, a total of 422 Murders were reported to law enforce- 
ment agencies in Maryland. This compares to 399 Murders in 1980 and 
results in an increase of 5.8 percent. Murder comprises 1 percent of 
the total Violent Crime category and .2 percent of the total Crime 
Index. 

A monthly analysis of Murder indicates that January, March 
and June had the highest frequencies and April and October had the 
lowest frequencies. In 1980, July had the highest frequency and 
April and October had the lowest frequencies. 



Rate 

In 1981 there were 9.9 victims of Murder for ewery 100,000 
residents in Maryland. During 1980, we reported a Murder Rate of 9.5 
victims per 100,000 population resulting in a 4.2 percent increase. 

Nature 

In 1981, firearms predominated as the weapon most often 
used in the commission of Murder in Maryland, representing 58.8 per- 
cent of the total. This compares to 58.4 percent of the total during 
1980. 44.1 percent of the total Murders were committed with handguns, 
while 23.0 percent were committed with a knife or cutting instrunient, 
10.2 percent with a shotgun, 4.3 percent with personal weapons, and 
14 percent with other dangerous weapons. In 1980, 46.9 percent of 
the total Murders were committed with handguns, while 27.1 percent 
were committed with a knife or cutting instrument, 5.3 percent with 
a shotgun, 4.5 percent with personal weapons and .0.0 percent with 
other dangerous weapons. 

The largest number of Murders (81) occurred in the 20-24 

age group, which comprised 19.2 percent of the total. In 1980, the 

largest number of Murders (85) occurred in the 25-29 age group, which 
comprised 21.3 percent of the total. 



38 



Murders, as a result of Robberies, accounted for 18.7 per- 
cent of the total Murders, while narcotic related Murders represented 
11.8 percent. 12.1 percent of the Murders were a result of arguments, 
while in 39.6 percent of the Murders the circumstances were not deter- 
mined at the time of the report. In 1980, Murders, as a result of 
Robberies, only accounted for 11 percent of the total Murders, while 
narcotic related Murders represented 7 percent. 16.5 percent of the 
Murders were a result of arguments, while in 48.4 percent of the Mur- 
ders, the circumstances were not determined at the time of the report. 



Clearances 

In 1981, 81 percent of all Murders were cleared with 7 per- 
cent of the total solved involving juvenile arrests. This compares 
to 1980 with a 77 percent clearance rate and 5 percent of the total 
cleared involving juveniles. 

Persons Arrested 

A total of 492 persons were arrested in Maryland for Murder 
during 1981. This represents a 25.8 percent increase when compared 
to 1980, with a total of 391 persons arrested for Murder. 

Of this total, 90 percent were males and 10 percent female. 
74 percent of the total were black while 26 percent were white. 86 
percent were adults and 14 percent were juveniles. 



39 



MURDER 



VOLUME BY MONTH 
1981 









Average 






60 - 


— 


.... 1981 








55 - 


- 










50 - 


- 










45 - 


- 










40 - 
35 - 
30 - 


- 




"^v 




25 - 


- 










20- 


- 










15 - 


- 










10- 


- 











JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



40 



MURDER 

DISTRIBUTION BY CIRCUMSTANCE 1981 













NUMBER OF 
MURDERS 


PERCENT 
DISTRIBUTION 


RAPE 










5 


1.2% 


ROBBERY 










79 


18.7% 


BURGLARY 










3 


.7% 


LARCENY 










1 


.2% 


ARSON 










7 


1.7% 


PROSTITUTION, 


COMMERCIALIZED ' 


i/ICE 


1 


.2% 


OTHER SEX 


OFFENSES 






2 


.5% 


NARCOTIC [ 


DRUG 


LAWS 






48 


11.4% 


LOVER'S TRIANGLE 






17 


4.0% 


BRAWL DUE 


TO 


THE INFLUENCE 


OF 


ALCOHOL 


21 


5.0% 


BRAWL DUE 


TO 


THE INFLUENCE 


OF 


DRUGS 


2 


.5% 


INSTITUTIONAL 


KILLINGS 






2 


.5% 


ARGUMENTS 










51 


12.1% 


OTHER 










16 


3.8% 


UNKNOWN 










167 


39.6% 


TOTAL 










422 


*100.0% 



♦Percent distribution does not add to 100% due to rounding. 



41 



MURDER 



DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE OF WEAPON 



5 YEAR TREND 



1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 



5 YEAR PERCENT 
TOTAL DISTRIB, 



HANDGUN 



143 156 193 187 186 



865 45. 6% 



BLUNT OBJECT 



13 



10 



12 



17 



22 



74 



3.9% 



RIFLE 



23 



11 



25 



19 



83 



4.4% 



SHOTGUN 
KNIFE 
PERSONAL 
ALL OTHERS 



29 



78 



19 



28 



24 



27 



21 



94 114 108 



33 



16 



20 



29 



18 



23 



43 



97 



18 



37 



144 



7.6% 



491 25.9% 



108 



133 



5.7% 



7.0% 



TOTAL 



333 338 406 399 422 1,898 *100.0% 



♦Percent distribution does not add to 100% due to rounding, 



42 



RAPE 




RAPE 



Rape is the carnal knowledge of a female forcibly and 
against her will. In Uniform Crime Reporting, Rape is divided into 
two categories: (1) Rape by Force; (2) Attempt to commit Forcible 
Rape. Statutory Rape or the carnal knowledge of a female with no 
force used and where the victim is under the legal age of consent, 
as well as other sex offenses, are not included in this category. 



Volume 

During 1981, 1,663 Forcible Rapes were reported to Mary- 
land law enforcement agencies. This compares to 1,681 Rapes during 
1980 and results in a 1 percent increase. 

Rape accounted for 4 percent of the Violent Crimes and .6 
percent of the total Crime Index. 

The month of July showed the highest frequency of Rapes, 
while April showed the lowest. In 1980, August had the highest 
frequency and February and March showed the lowest. 

Rate 

A Crime Rate, in its proper perspective, is a victim risk 
rate since it equates the number of crimes per unit of population. 
In 1981, 78.1 out of eyery 100,000 females in Maryland were reported 
Rape victims, as compared to 1980, when 80.2 per 100,000 female popu- 
lation were reported victims. This results in a 2.6 percent decrease 
in the rate of Forcible Rapes. 

Nature 

During 1981, 78 percent of all Rapes were actual Rapes by 
Force while 22 percent were attempts or assaults to commit Forcible 
Rape, the same as in 1980. 

Clearances 

In Calendar Year 1981, 58 percent of the total number of 
Rapes were cleared by arrest with 7 percent of th j total solved 
involving juvenile arrests. In 1980, 54 percent of the total Rapes 
were cleared and 9 percent of the total cleared involved juveniles. 



44 



Persons Arrested 

In 1981 there were 919 persons arrested for Rape in Maryland. 
In comparison to 1980, with 869, there was a 5.8 percent increase in the 
number of arrests. 

83 percent of the total number were 18 years of age or older, 
while the remaining 17 percent were juveniles. 68 percent of the total 
were black and 32 percent white. 



45 



RAPE 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUrU". JULY AUG StPT OCT liOV DEC 



46 



RAPE 

PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY NATURE 1981 



78% 




Force 



pT^rl Attempt 





5 Yr. 
Total 


1981 


1 980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


Force 


6,132 


1,297 


1,307 


1,243 


1,169 


1,116 


Attempt 


1,755 


366 


374 


385 


307 


323 



47 



ROBBERY 



I 
I 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 




ROBBERY 



Robbery is defined as the taking, or attempting to take, 
anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or 
persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting 
the victim in fear. The element of personal confrontation is always 
present in this crime. Under the Uniform Crime Reporting Program, 
all attempts to commit Robbery are included. Robberies are reported 
in four general categories -- firearms; knife or cutting instrument; 
other dangerous weapons; and hands, fists, feet, etc. As a general 
rule. Robbery differs from Larceny in that it is aggravated by the 
element of force or threat of force. 

Robbery, as a crime of Violence, has a serious impact on 
the victim. In many instances serious injury results. Oftentime, 
with or without physical injury, the victim suffers mental anguish. 
Such damage is immeasurable. 

Volume 

During 1981, there were 18,095 actual Robbery offenses 
reported to Maryland law enforcement agencies. In 1980, there 
were 16,462 Robberies, which results in an increase of 10 percent. 

Robbery accounted for 48 percent of the Violent Crime 
category and 6.5 percent of the total Crime Index. 

A monthly comparison reveals that January had the high- 
est frequency of Robberies, while April had the lowest frequency. 
In 1980, December had the highest frequency and April had the 
lowest. 



Rate 

The 1981 Robbery Rate was 424.7 per 100,000 inhabitants. 
This compares to a rate of 392.7 per 100,000 population in 1980, 
and results in an 8.1 percent increase in the Robbery Rate. 

Nature 

During 1981, 59.7 percent of the Robberies were committed 
in the street, while only 1.5 percent were Bank Robberies. This 
compares to 1980 when 60.9 percent were committed in the street and 
1.5 percent were Bank Robberies. 

Bank Robberies accounted for the highest average value 
loss, $5,757 in 1981. The average value loss for total Robberies 
was 512. 



50 



Armed perpetrators were responsible for 58.0 percent of 
the Robbery offenses while 42.0 percent were muggings or strong- 
armed Robberies. This compares to 1980, when 54.7 percent involved 
Armed Robberies and 45.3 percent were strong-arm. 

An analysis of Armed Robbery by type of weapon indicates 
that the use of firearms was predominate, accounting for 76.2 per- 
cent of all Armed Robberies. Knives or cutting instruments made up 
12 8 percent while other dangerous weapons accounted for 10.9 per- 
cent of all Armed Robberies. In 1980, 74.7 percent of the total 
Armed Robberies were committed with firearms, 13.7 percent with 
knives or cutting instruments, and 11.6 percent with other danger- 
ous weapons. 

Clearances 

In 1981, 23 percent of the total number of Robberies were 
cleared by arrest'with 24 percent of the total solved involving a 
juvenile arrest. In 1980, 23 percent of the Robberies were cleared 
and 29 percent of those involved juveniles. 

23 percent of the Armed Robberies were cleared with 12 
percent of the total solved involving a juvenile arrest. 23 percent 
of the strong-arm Robberies recorded a clearance, while 41 percent 
of the total involved juveniles. 

Persons Arrested 

5 403 persons were arrested for Robbery in Maryland during 
1981. In comparison with 1980, and a total of 4,964 persons arrested, 
there was an 8.8 percent increase in Robbery arrests. 

62 percent of the total number of persons arrested for 
Robbery were adults, while the remaining 38 percent were juveniles. 

81 percent of the total persons arrested were black and 
19 percent were white. 96 percent were males and 4 percent females. 



51 



ROBBERY 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 







2,000- 
1,900- 
1 ,800- 
1,700- 
1,600- 

1,500- 
1 ,400- 
1,300- 
1,200- 
1,100- 


- \ / / 


1,000- 


\---^ 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



52 



ROBBERY 

VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN 



1981 



CLASSIFICATION 

Hi ghway 

Commercial House 

Service Station 

Convenience Store 

Residence 

Bank 

Miscellaneous 



NUMBER PERCENT TOTAL AVERAGE 
OF OF VALUES VALUES 
OFFENSES DISTRIB. (DOLLARS) (DOLLARS) 



10,802 



2,481 



689 



739 



1,261 



263 



1 ,860 



13.7% 2,053,177 



3.8% 



4.1% 



235,646 



600,878 



7.0% 1,010,573 



59.7% $2,802,979 $ 259 



828 



342 



813 



801 



1.5% 1,513,990 5,757 



10.3% 1,044,455 



562 



TOTAL 



18,095 *100.0% $9,261,698 $ 512 



*Percent distribution does not add to 100% due to rounding. 



53 



ROBBERY 

DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE OF WEAPON 1981 



44.2% 




Firearm 



Knife 



Strong Arm 



Other 



1977 



Firearm 


29,033 


7,998 


6,726 


5,187 


/|,787 


4,335 


Kn i fe 


5,778 


1,347 


1,23^ 


1,162 


1,031 


1,004 


Strong 

Arm 


33,470 


7,602 


7,461 


6,455 


6,103 


5,849 


Other 


4,937 


i,i4n 


1 ,041 


941 


907 


900 



54 



AGGRAVATED 

ASSAULT 




AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 



Aggravated Assault, as defined under the Maryland Uniform 
Crime Reporting Program, is an unlawful attack by one person upon 
another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily 
injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of 
a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm. 
Attempts are included since it is not necessary that any injury 
result when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which would result 
in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed. 
Also included in this category are all attempted Murders. 

Any assault in which hands, fists and feet are used and 
no serious injury to the victim results, is classified as a simple 
assault which falls into the Part II category, and is not included 
as a Crime Index Offense. 



Volume 

During 1981, a total of 17,691 Aggravated Assaults were 
reported to Maryland law enforcement agencies. In comparison, 
there were 17,182 Aggravated Assaults in 1980, resulting in a 3 
percent increase. 

Aggravated Assault made up 47 percent of the Violent Crime 
category and 6.3 percent of the total Crime Index. 

The month of July had the highest frequency of Aggravated 
Assaults occurring while February had the lowest. During 1980, 
August showed the highest frequency and February showed the lowest. 

Rate 

For each 100,000 persons in Maryland during 1981, there 
were 415.2 victims of Aggravated Assault. During 1980, there were 
409.9 Aggravated Assault victims per 100,000 population. A com- 
parison of the two years results in a 1.3 percent increase. 



Nature 

In 1981, 25.4 percent of the Aggravated Assaults were 
committed with the use of a firearm. A knife or cutting instru- 
ment was used in 23.8 percent of Assaults, and 31.9 percent were 
committed with other dangerous weapons. The remaining 18.9 per- 
cent were committed with personal weapons such as hands, fists, 
feet, etc. These figures compare to 1980, when 22.1 percent of 
Aggravated Assaults were committed with a firearm, 23.9 percent 



56 



with a knife or cutting instrument, 33.6 percent with other dangerous 
weapons, and 20.4 percent with personal weapons. 

Clearances 

55 percent of the total number of Aggravated Assaults were 
cleared by arrest with 15 percent of the total clearances involving 
juveniles. As compared to 1980, 57 percent of the total were cleared, 
and of those cleared, 15 percent involved juveniles. 

Persons Arrested 

There were 5,606 arrests for Aggravated Assault in Maryland 
during 1981. This results in a 3.6 percent decrease when compared 
to 1980, with 5,815 persons arrested. 

77 percent of the total number of persons arrested for 
Aggravated Assault were adults, while 23 percent were juveniles. 
49 percent of the total were black, 50 percent white, and 1 percent 
of other races. 85 percent of the total were males, while 15 per- 
cent were females. 



57 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

VOLUME BY MONTH 
1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



58 



AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 

DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE OF WEAPON 1981 



25.4% 



23.8% 



18.9% 




y////\ Firearm 



Firearm 


18,426 


4,498 


3,791 


3,746 


3,252 


3,139 


Knife 


21,318 


4,204 


4,108 


4,542 


4,378 


4,086 


Other 


27,342 


5,651 


5,779 


5,632 


5,268 


5,012 


Hands, 
etc. 


15,666 


3,338 


3,504 


3,417 


2,788 


2,519 



59 



BREAKING OR 
ENTERING 




OR ENTERING 



Breaking or Entering is defined as the unlawful entry of a 
structure to commit a felony or a theft. 

Data collection for this offense is further categorized as 
to forcible entries, unlawful entries where no force is used, and 
attempted forcible entries. 

As with other Property Crimes, the motive of personal gain 
coupled with the element of opportunity, results in the commission 
of this offense by both the amateur and the professional perpetrator. 
Only the absence of confrontation and use of force separate this crime 
from Robbery of the the Violent Crime group. 

The volume of this offense presents the police with a seri- 
ous enforcement problem, made more difficult in many areas, by the 
lack of sufficient personnel to act as a deterrent and to provide 
successful solutions to these crimes. 



Volume 

In 1981, a total of 70,762 Breaking or Enterings were re- 
ported to Maryland law enforcement agencies. In comparison, there 
were 71,130 Breaking or Enterings in 1980 resulting in a 1 percent 
decrease. 

Breaking or Enterings made up 29 percent of the Property 
Crime category and 25.3 percent of the total Crime Index. 

A monthly analysis reveals that January had the highest 
frequency of occurrence while May had the lowest frequency. In 
1980, December showed the highest frequency and February showed 
the lowest. 



Rate 

The Breaking or Entering Rate was 1,660.7 per 100,000 
inhabitants of Maryland during 1981. In 1980, there were 1,696.8 
Breaking or Entering victims per 100,000 population. In compari- 
son, this results in a 2.1 percent decrease in the Breaking or 
Entering Rate. 

Nature 

In 1981, 78.2 percent of the Breaking or Enterings in- 
volved forcible entry, 11.7 percent were unlawful entries (without 
force), and 10.1 percent were recorded as attempted forcible entries 



62 



In comparison, 77.1 percent were forcible entry, 13.2 percent were 
unlawful entries, and 9.7 percent were attempted forcible entries 
during 1980. 

67.4 percent of all Breaking or Enterings were committed 
in a residence, while 32.6 percent were committed in a nonresidence 
structure. During 1980, 67.2 percent were committed in a residence, 
while 32.8 percent were committed in a nonresidence structure. 

The average dollar value loss for Breaking or Entering was 
$926. This compares to 1980 with $937, and results in a 1.2 percent 
decrease. 



Clearances 

In 1981, law enforcement agencies in Maryland were success- 
ful in clearing 17 percent of the total Breaking or Entering Offenses, 
of which 33 percent involved juveniles. During 1980, police cleared 
17 percent of the total Breaking or Enterings, with 35 percent of 
that number involving juveniles. 

Persons Arrested 

In 1981, there were 14,321 persons arrested in Maryland 
for Breaking or Entering. When compared to 1980, with 13,983 
arrests, there is a 2 percent increase in Breaking or Entering 
arrests. 

53 percent of the total number of persons arrested for 
Breaking or Entering were adults, while 47 percent were juveniles. 
53 percent of the total were white, 46 percent were black, and 1 
percent of other races. 95 percent of the total were males, while 
the remaining 5 percent were females. 



63 



BREAKING OR ENTERING 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 





C V v> Awi^i^^/-ir\ 


9,000 - 


■■^■^■^^^^^ sJ 11 nvciuyv- 


8,500 - 


- 


8,000 - 


- 


7,500 - 


- 


7,000 - 


- 


6,500 - 


^ 


6,000 - 
5,500 - 




5,000 - 


^^.^ 


4,500 - 


-^^y^^^'^^^ 


4,000- 


- 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



64 



BREAKING OR ENTERING 



VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN 



1981 



CLASSIFICATION 


NUMBER 

OF 

OFFENSES 


PERCENT 

OF 
DISTRIB. 


TOTAL 
VALUES 
(DOLLARS) 

$42,833,149 


AV 

VA 

(DO 

$ 


ERAGE 

LUES 

LLARS) 


RESIDENCE TOTAL 


47,721 


67.4% 


898 


Night 


14,013 


19.8% 


10,789,874 




770 


Day 


19,192 


27.1% 


19,022,844 




991 


Unknown 


14,516 


20.5% 


13,070,431 




900 


NONRESIDENCE TOTAL 


23,041 


32.6% 


22,672,351 




984 


Night 


9,054 


12.8% 


5,568,620 




615 


Day 


4,547 


6.4% 


2,755,807 




606 


Unknown 


9,440 


13.3% 


14,347,924 




1,520 


GRAND TOTAL 


70,762 


*100.0% 


$65,505,500 


$ 


926 



^Percent distribution does not equal 100% due to rounding 



65 



BREAKING OR ENTERING 

PERCENT DISTRIBTION BY TYPE 1981 

1981 



78.2"^ 



n . 7% 




10. n 



1 


Forcible 






W<- 


No Force 


1;':-: 


Attempt 



1977 



Forcible 


247,301 


55,362 


54,879 


48,036 


44,734 


44,290 


No Force 


41,911 


8,246 


9,357 


8,366 


8,193 


7,749 


Attempt 


32,176 


7,154 


6,894 


6,255 


5,974 


5,899 



66 



LARCENY 




LARCENY 



Larceny-Theft is defined as the unlawful taking, carrying, 
leading, or riding away of property from the possession or construc- 
tive possession of another. It includes such crimes as pocket-pick- 
ing, shoplifting, purse snatching, thefts from autos, thefts of auto 
parts and accessories, bicycle theft, etc. In the UCR Program, this 
category does not include embezzlement, fraud, forgery, and worthless 
checks. Motor Vehicle Theft, being a special problem, is a separate 
Crime Index Offense and is not reported in the Larceny-Theft category, 

Larceny Offenses cleared by police arrest are dramatically 
affected by the nature of the crime. As with other Property Crimes, 
opportunity and stealth, working in favor of the perpetrator and 
against police detection, reduce solutions for this offense. 

As with other Offenses against Property, Larceny is pri- 
marily a crime of opportunity. Types of Larcenies will differ in 
volume depending upon the opportunity for theft offered in a given 
area. 

The average dollar loss in this category was $288 as com- 
pared to 1980, with an average loss of $282, and results in a 2.1 
percent increase. A very small portion of goods stolen are recover- 
ed and returned to victims, due to a low clearance rate and lack of 
specific identification characteristics on such property. In addi- 
tion, many offenses in this category, particularly where the value 
of goods stolen is small, never come to police attention. 



Volume 

In 1981, there were 152,544 Offenses of Larceny-Theft 
reported as compared to 1980 with 152,089 Offenses and a .3 percent 
increase. Larceny-Theft makes up 54.5 percent of the Crime Index 
total and 63.1 percent of the Property Crime total. 

August shows the highest frequency of Larceny Offenses in 
a monthly analysis, while January shows the lowest. This compares 
with 1980, when August showed the highest frequency and February 
showed the lowest. 



Rate 

The Larceny Crime Rate was 3,580.0 per 100,000 inhabitants 
of Maryland during 1981. In 1980, there were 3,628.1 Larcenies per 
100,000 population, resulting in a 1.3 percent decrease in the Lar- 
ceny Rate. 



68 



Nature 

Larcenies of Auto Parts and Accessories recorded the high- 
est percentage with 25.6 percent of the total Larcenies reported in 
this category. Pocket-Picking had the lowest frequency with a .8 
percent of the total. In 1980, Larcenies of Auto Parts and Accesso- 
ries had the highest frequency with a 26.2 percent of the total while 
Pocket-Picking had the lowest frequency with .9 percent. 

Clearances 

In 1981, law enforcement agencies cleared 18 percent of 
the total Larceny-Theft Offenses, of which 29 percent of the total 
clearances involved juveniles. This demonstrates the involvement 
of the young age group in the Larceny-Theft category. In 1980, 
police cleared 18 percent of the total Larceny Offenses with 33 per- 
cent of that number involving a juvenile arrest. 

Persons Arrested 

There were 30,528 persons arrested for Larceny in Maryland 
during 1981. In comparison to 1980, with 29,996 Larceny arrests, 
there was a 1.8 percent increase in the number of persons arrested. 

36 percent of the total persons arrested for Larceny were 
under 18 years of age. However, when individuals under the age of 
21 were considered, the percentage rose to 54 percent of the total. 

Females comprised 24 percent of all arrests for Larceny, 
and had a greater involvement in this offense than in any of the 
other Crime Index Offenses. 

56 percent of all persons arrested for Larceny were 
black and 44 percent were white. 



69 



LARCENY 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



70 



LARCENY 



VALUE OF PROPERTY STOLEN 



1981 



CLASSIFICATION 



NUMBER PERCENT TOTAL AVERAGE 
OF OF VALUES VALUES 
OFFENSES DISTRIB. (DOLLARS) (DOLLARS) 



Pocket-Picking 
Purse-Snatching 
Shoplifting 
From Autos 



1,296 



3,151 



.8% $ 170,936 



2.1% 



370,257 



16,437 10.8% 1,906,520 



23,155 15.2% 8,072,076 



Auto Parts & Access. 39,037 25.6% 6,094,792 



Bicycles 



From Buildings 



11,038 



7.2% 1,550,304 



28,402 18.6% 11,951,693 



Coin Operated Machines 2,035 1.3% 187,789 



All Others 



27,993 18.4% 13,620,095 



TOTAL 



152,544 100.0% *$43, 924,461 



*Total does not equal breakdown due to rounding. 



$ 132 
118 
116 
349 
156 
140 
421 
92 
487 



$ 288 



71 



MOTOR VEHICLE 

THEFT 




MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



Motor Vehicle Theft is defined as the theft or attempted 
theft of a motor vehicle. This definition excludes taking a motor 
vehicle for temporary use, such as a family situation or unauthori- 
zed use by others having lawful access to the vehicle, such as 
chauffeurs, etc. 

The crime of Motor Vehicle Theft has been labeled pri- 
marily as a crime of opportunity. The youthful offender finds the 
motor vehicle easily accessible for transportation for any purpose. 
The remaining thefts are mainly for the purpose of resale, theft of 
parts, and for use in committing other crimes. 

Volume 

In 1981, there were 18,486 Motor Vehicle Thefts reported 
to law enforcement agencies in the state of Maryland. This is a 
2 percent decrease when compared to the 18,885 Motor Vehicle Thefts 
reported in 1980. Motor Vehicle Theft makes up 7.6 percent of the 
Property Offense category and 6.6 percent of the Index Offenses. 

A monthly analysis for 1981 indicates that more motor 
vehicles were stolen during July than other months, and April 
showed the fewest being stolen. During 1980, August had the 
greatest frequency of Motor Vehicle Thefts and February showed 
the fewest number being stolen. 

Rate 

The Motor Vehicle Theft Rate of 433.8 per 100,000 inhabi- 
tants is 3.7 percent lower than the rate of 450.5 per 100,000 in- 
habitants for 1980. 

Nature 

Automobiles accounted for 73.1 percent of the total number 
of vehicles stolen. Trucks and buses made up 10.5 percent and other 
motor vehicles comprised 16.4 percent of the total. 

68.8 percent of the stolen value was recovered. This is 
a 2 percent increase when compared to the 67.3 percent of the stolen 
value recovered in 1980. 



74 



Clearances 

In 1981, law enforcement agencies cleared 17 percent of the 
Motor Vehicle Thefts, when compared to the 16 percent cleared in 1980. 

30 percent of the total clearances for Motor Vehicle Theft 
involved juveniles during 1981, compared to 33 percent in 1981. 



Persons Arrested 

3,135 persons were arrested in Maryland for Motor Vehicle 
Theft during 1981. This results in an 11.8 percent decrease when 
compared to the 3,556 arrests in 1980. 

Of the total persons arrested for Motor Vehicle Theft, 
53 percent were adults and 47 percent juveniles. 48 percent of the 
total were white, while 52 percent were black. 92 percent of the 
total persons arrested for Motor Vehicle Theft were males and 8 
percent were females. 



75 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 







Average 






2,100 - 


— — - 1981 


2,000 - 


- 








1,900 - 


- 








1,800 - 
1,700 - 
1,600 - 
1,500 - 


V 




# y 

# / 

/ / 




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r^ 








1,300 - 


-V 








1,200 - 


V 








1,100 - 


- 









JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



76 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE 1981 



16.4% 



10.5% 



73.1% 




Auto 


69,679 


13,522 


13,490 


15,004 


13,616 


14,047 


Truck 


8,982 


1,940 


1,973 


2,079 


1,684 


1,306 


Other 


14,258 


3,024 


3,422 


3,134 


2,299 


2,379 



77 



MOTOR VEHICLE THEFT 



PERCENT OF VALUE RECOVERED 1981 



31.2% 



68.8% 




I I Recovered 
[v/*| Not Recovered 





Total 


1981 


1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


Stolen 


204 
Million 


48 
Million 


44 
Million 


47 
Mi 11 ion 


35 
Mi 11 i on 


30 
Mi 1 1 ion 


Recovered 


141 
Mill ion 


33 
Mil 1 ion 


30 
Mill ion 


32 
Mil 1 ion 


25 
Mill ion 


21 
Mi 1 1 ion 



78 



ti 





ARSON 



Arson is defined as any willful or malicious burning or 
attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, 
public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of 
another, etc. Only fires determined through investigation to have 
been willfully or maliciously set are classified as Arsons. Fires 
of suspicious or unknown origins dre excluded. 

Arson offenses frequently occur in conjunction with other 
index crimes; e.g.. Breaking or Entering. However, according to UCR 
procedures in such multiple offense situations, only one crime is 
selected on the basis of an established hierarchy. For example, if 
a Breaking or Entering and Arson occurred at the same time and place, 
only the Breaking or Entering would be reported if the crimes were 
subjected to the hierarchy rule of reporting index offenses. This 
assumes that Arson would be listed subordinate to Breaking or Enter- 
ing in the hierarchy. Arson has been excluded from this hierarchi- 
cal procedure, and regardless of its occurrence in conjunction with 
another crime against property or crime against a person, the Arson 
is reported. 

Volume 

In 1981, there were 3,923 Arsons reported. This is a 1.6 
percent increase when compared to the 3,863 Arsons reported in 1980, 

A monthly analysis indicates March had the highest fre- 
quency of occurrence, while June had the lowest. In 1980, November 
and December showed the highest frequency, while May showed the 
lowest. 



Nature 

The most frequent target of Arsons in 1981 were structures, 
comprising 57 percent of the total reported incidents. Mobile (motor 
vehicles, trailers, airplanes, boats, etc.) and other property (crops, 
timber, fences, signs, etc.) accounted for the remaining offenses 
with 15 and 28 percent respectively. 

Residences comprised 57 percent of the structures at which 
Arsons were directed. 15 percent of all targeted structural property 
was uninhabited or abandoned at the time the Ars n occurred. 

The total monetary value of property damaged, due to re- 
ported Arsons during 1981, was over 27 million dollars with an aver- 
age loss per incident of $6,923. Industrial/manufacturing structures 
registered the highest average loss at $23,638 per offense. 



80 



Clearances 

25 percent of all reported Arsons were cleared by arrest 
or exceptional means in 1981, compared to 21 percent in 1980. 

51 percent of the total clearances for Arson involved ju- 
veniles during 1981, compared to 44 percent in 1980. 

Persons Arrested 

In 1981, there were 847 persons arrested in Maryland for 
Arson. This results in a 12 percent increase when compared to the 
756 arrests in 1980. 

44 percent of the total number of persons arrested for 
Arson were adults, while 56 percent were juveniles. 71 percent of 
the total were white and 29 percent were black. 86 percent of the 
total were males, while the remaining 14 percent were females. 



81 



ARSON 



VOLUME BY MONTH 



1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



82 



ARSON 



DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE OF PROPERTY 



1981 



CLASSIFICATION 


NUMBER 

OF 

OFFENSES 


PERCENT 

OF 
DISTRIB. 


AVERAGE 

VALUES 

(DOLLARS) 


PERCENT 
CLEARED 


TOTAL STRUCTURAL 


2,230 


56.8% 


$ 11,340 


25% 


Single Occupancy Residen- 
tial 
Other Residential 


820 
442 


20.9% 
11.3% 


11,916 
5,804 


27% 
27% 


Storage 


258 


6.6% 


11,796 


16% 


Industrial /Manufacturing 


12 


.3% 


23,638 


42% 


Other Commercial 


288 


7.3% 


20,842 


14% 


Community/ Public 


304 


7.7% 


6,107 


39% 


All Other Structure 


106 


2.7% 


16,671 


10% 


TOTAL MOBILE 


578 


14.7% 


$ 2,656 


16% 


Motor Vehicles 


516 


13.2% 


2,030 


15% 


Other Mobile Property 


62 


1.6% 


7,868 


23% 



OTHER 



1,115 



28.4% 



298 



29% 



TOTAL 



3,923 *100.0% 



$ 6,923 



25% 



♦Percent distribution does not add to 100% due to rounding. 



83 



INDEX OFFENSE DATA 



The tables contained within this section were designed to 
facilitate quick reference of statistical crime information relative 
to the different reporting areas of the State of Maryland. 

The tables are broken down by Regions. Within each Region 
information is listed in County name sequence and is further detailed 
to show the activity experienced by individual police agencies. The 
general identifying descriptions which indicate the reporting areas 
are listed and defined as follows: 



Region Total 



County Total 



Sheriff 



This line indicates the total activity of 
all the Counties within the indicated Region 

This line indicates the total activity of 
all reporting Agencies within the indicated 
County. 

This line indicates the total activity 
reported by Sheriff's Offices. This is to 
include activity which may have occurred 
within the corporate limits of towns in 
that County. 



County Pol ice 
Departments ■ 



This line indicates the total activity 
reported by County Police Departments. 
This is to include activity which may 
have occurred within the corporate limits 
of towns in that County. 



State Police - This line indicates the total activity 

reported by all State Police installations 
within the indicated reporting area. 
This is to include activity which may 
have occurred within the corporate limits 
of towns in that County. 



Municipal 

Police 

Departments 



This line indicates the total activity 
reported by the individually specified 
police department to include only those 
crimes which were handled by that depart- 
ment. 



85 



INDEX OFFENSE DATA (Cont'd) 

The five Regions used in the Maryland Uniform Crime Report- 
ing Program consist of the following: 

Region I - Eastern Shore 

Carol ine County 
Cecil County 
Dorchester County 
Kent County 
Queen Anne's County 
Somerset County 
Talbot County 
Wicomico County 
Worcester County 

Region II - Southern Maryland 

Calvert County 
Charles County 
St. Mary's County 

Region III - Western Maryland 

Allegany County 
Carroll County 
Frederick County 
Garrett County 
Washington County 

Region IV - Washington Metropolitan Region 

Montgomery County 
Prince George's County 

Region V - Baltimore Metropolitan Region 

Baltimore City 
Anne Arundel County 
Baltimore County 
Harford County 
Howard County 

The tabulations in this section indicate the volume of Crime 
in Maryland. The measure used is a Crime Index consisting of seven 
offenses which are counted as they become known to the law enforcement 
agencies. Crime classifications used in the Index are: Murder and 
Nonnegligent Manslaughter, Forcible Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault, 
Breaking or Entering, Larceny-Theft, and Motor Vehicle Theft*. 

*Arson figures included are not computed in the total offenses or 
crime rates. 



86 



INDEX OFFENSE DATA (Cont'd) 



Each heading contained in this report is defined below: 

Population: Estimated population of the State, 

Regions, and Counties. This informa- 
tion, representative of 1980, was 
provided by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation. 



Total Offenses: 



Total Cleared: 



Percent Cleared: 



This is the sum total of the seven 
Index Offenses. 

The sum total of the seven Index 
Offenses cleared. 

The percentage of Index Offenses 
cleared by arrest or exceptional 
means. The mathematical formula 
may be expressed as follows: 



Percent Cleared = 



Total Index Offenses Cleared 

Total Actual Index Offenses Reported x 100 



Crime Rate: 



Example: 



This rate is the number of Index 
Offenses per 100,000 population. 
To compute a crime rate, you must 
divide the population by 100,000 
and divide the number of offenses 
by that answer. 

Population for Region I = 295,824 
Number of Index Offenses for Region I 
in 1980 = 14,522 

2 95,824 . 2,958 
100,000 

2,958 "^'^^^-^ 
Crime Rate for Region I = 4,909.4 



Crime Rates for the individual agencies are not calculated in 
the following table because of overlapping jurisdiction in many cities 
of municipal, county and state law enforcement agencies. This table 
contains the offenses reported by the individual agencies with crime 
rates for the county and region totals. Arson offenses in this table 
are listed opposite the agency reporting the arson. In the Municipa- 
lity Table, the Arsons are listed in the municipality where they 
occurred. 



87 









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120 



MUNICIPALITY CRIME RATES 



Crime Rates for the individual cities are calculated in the 
following table. The rates for many cities are based on combined 
figures of municipal, county and state Law Enforcement Agencies due 
to overlapping jurisdictions.* 



*Crime Rates for individual cities in Prince George's County are not 
calculated in this publication because of the overlapping jurisdictions, 
At this time Prince George's County Police Department is unable to fur- 
nish the Maryland UCR Program with a breakdown of crime for the munici- 
palities in their jurisdiction. Therefore, to have computed a crime 
rate for many cities in Prince George's County would have given a mis- 
leading picture of the crime problem in those areas. 



121 



i» 



REGION I 


CAROLINE COUNTY 


Denton 


1980 


8.210.5 


156 








3 


21 


28 


104 





(0) 




1981 


8,250.0 


165 





1 


7 


15 


35 


105 


2 


(2) 




X Change 


+ .5 


+6.0 


. 


. 


+133.3 


-28.6 


+25.0 


+1.0 


. 


.(-!.. 


Federal sburg 


1980 


5.128.2 


100 


1 


1 





15 


18 


60 


5 


(3) 




1981 


4,400.0 


88 








1 


7 


26 


48 


6 


(2) 




% Change 


-14.2 


-12.0 


-100.0 


-100.0 


- 


-53.3 


+44.4 


-20.0 


+20.0 



(-33.3) 


Goldsboro 


1980 


- 























(1) 




1981 


- 


























(0) 




% Change 


. 


. 


- 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


(-100.0) 


Greensboro 


1980 


1.360.0 


17 

















15 


2 


(1) 




1981 


3.833.3 


46 











1 


7 


36 


2 


(0) 




t Change 


+181.9 


+170.6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


+140.0 





(-100.0) 


Harydel 


1980 


500.0 


1 














1 








(0) 




1981 


500.0 


1 











1 











(0) 




X Change 








- 


. 


. 


. 


-100.0 


1 


2 


(-) 


Preston 


1980 


2.631.6 


13 











2 


8 


(0) 




1981 


5.000.0 


25 








2 


4 


6 


11 


2 


(1) 




X Change 


+90.0 


+92.3 


. 


. 


. 


+100.0 


-25.0 


+1,000.0 
36 



2 


(-) 


Ridgely 


1980 


5.326.1 


49 











1 


10 


(2) 




1981 


7.000.0 


63 











2 


21 


39 


1 


w 




X Chanoe 


+31.4 


+28.6 


. 


. 


. 


+100.0 


+110.0 


+8.3 


-50.0 


(+100.0) 


CECIL COUNTY 


Cecil ton 


1980 


2.000.0 


10 














7 


3 









1981 


2.200.0 


11 

















10 


1 






X Change 


+10.0 


+10.0 


. 


_ 


. 


. 


-100.0 


+233.3 


- 




Charlestown 


1980 


2.571.4 


18 











1 


8 


8 


1 






1981 


5.142.9 


36 











9 


6 


16 


5 






X Change 


+100.0 


+100.0 


_ 


_ 


_ 


+800.0 


-25.0 


+100.0 


+400.0 




Chesapeake City 


1980 


3,636.4 


32 














18 


11 


3 


(5) 




1981 


3.111.1 


28 











3 


9 


13 


3 


(5) 




X Change 


-14.4 


-12.5 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


-50.0 


+18.2 





(0) 


Elkton 


1980 


7,162.8 


462 


1 


1 


8 


30 


58 


321 


43 


(16) 




1981 


8.151.5 


538 





2 


9 


22 


116 


342 


47 


(6) 




X Change 


+13.8 


+16.5 


-100.0 


+100.0 


+12.5 


-26.7 


+100.0 


+6.5 
70 


+9.3 
3 


(-62.5) 


Northeast 


1980 


6.533.3 


98 








2 


1 


22 


(2) 




1981 


7.600.0 


114 








1 


15 


20 


67 


11 


(2) 




X Change 


+16.3 


+16.3 


_ 


. 


-50.0 


+1,400.0 


-9.1 


-4.3 


+266.7 


(0) 


PerryviUe 


1980 


4.631.6 


88 








1 


5 


29 


50 


3 


(0) 




1981 


3.900.0 


78 








1 


9 


22 


41 


5 


(1) 




X Change 


-15.8 


-11.4 


. 


. 





+80.0 


-24.1 


-18.0 


+66.7 


(-) 


Port Deposit 


1980 


5.873.5 


39 








2 


5 


15 


17 





(4) 




1981 


6.571.4 


46 





1 





9 


16 


19 


1 


(1) 




X Change 


+11.9 


+17.9 


. 


. 


-100.0 


+80.0 


+6.7 


+ 11.8 


- 


(-75.0) 


Rising Sun 


1980 


4,070.8 


46 








1 





8 


34 


3 


0) 




1981 


4.181.8 


46 














3 


42 


1 


(4) 




X Change 


♦ 2.7 





- 


- 


-100.0 


- 


-62.5 


♦23.5 


-66.7 


(+300.0) 



122 







Is 


9! 

— C 


0) 

i 


3 


1 

s 


> ^ 


11 


-J h- 




1 


nnRrHFSTFR county 


Cambridge 


1980 


7,393.2 


865 





1 


15 


77 


205 


540 


27 


(6) 




1981 


9,008.4 


1,072 


2 


2 


9 


107 


216 


706 


30 


(10) 




% Change 


t21.8 


+23.9 


. 


+100.0 


-40.0 


+39.0 


♦5.4 


+30.7 


♦11.1 


(♦66.7) 


Hurlock 


1980 


4,606.1 


76 





1 





12 


11 


45 


7 






1981 


3,411.8 


58 











2 


15 


39 


2 






% Change 


-25.9 


-23.7 


_ 


-100.0 


. 


-83.3 


+36.4 


-13.3 


-71.4 




KENT 


Chestertown 


1980 


6,225.8 


193 





1 


2 


10 


45 


130 


5 


(1) 




1981 


5,911.8 


201 








2 


14 


28 


151 


6 


(4) 




% Change 


-5.0 


+4.1 


. 


-100.0 





+40.0 


-37.8 


+16.2 


+20.0 


(+300.0) 


Rock Hall 


1980 


7,266.7 


109 








2 


7 


21 


73 


6 


(1) 




1981 


9,600.0 


144 








1 


11 


38 


88 


6 






% Change 


+32.1 


+32.1 


. 


. 


-50.0 


+57.1 


+81.0 


+20.5 





(-100.0) 


QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 


Centreville 


1980 


3,500.0 


77 








1 


2 


19 


52 


3 


(3) 




1981 


4,450.0 


89 





2 





1 


22 


60 


4 


(1) 




% Change 


+27.1 


+15.6 


. 


. 


-100.0 


-50.0 


+15.8 


+15.4 


♦33.3 


(-66.7) 


SOMERSET COUNTY 


Crisfield 


1980 


5,413.8 


157 








3 


1 


77 


72 


4 


(1) 




1981 


5,733.3 


172 


1 


1 





5 


51 


102 


12 


(2) 




% Change 


+5.9 


+9.6 


. 


- 


-100.0 


+400.0 


-33.8 


+41.7 


+200.0 


(+100.0) 


Princess Anne 


1980 


8,133.3 


122 








3 


3 


42 


67 


7 


(4) 




1981 


9,400.0 


141 











2 


42 


89 


8 


(2) 




Z Change 


+15.6 


+ 15.6 


. 


_ 


-100.0 


-33.3 





+32.8 


+14.3 


(-50.0) 


TALBOT COUNTY 


Easton 


1980 


6,911.4 


546 





2 


5 


27 


126 


365 


21 


(6) 




1981 


7,839.5 


635 





1 


13 


31 


121 


444 


25 


(6) 




% Change 


+13.4 


+16.3 


- 


-50.0 


+160.0 


+14.8 


-4.0 


+21.6 


+19.0 


(0) 


Oxford 


1980 


400.0 


3 














1 


2 









1981 


500.0 


4 











1 


2 


1 









% Change 


+25.0 


+33.3 


_ 


- 


- 


- 


+100.0 


-50.0 


- 




St. Michaels 


1980 


4,461.5 


58 














10 


48 









1981 


4,846.2 


63 











12 


8 


43 









% Change 


+8.6 


+8.6 


. 


. 


- 


- 


-20.0 


-10.4 


- 




Trappe 


1980 


2,432.4 


18 














4 


14 









1981 


375.0 


3 











2 


1 












% Change 


-84.6 


-83.3 


_ 


. 


. 


- 


-75.0 


-100.0 


- 




WICOMICO COUNTY 


Delmar 


1980 


9,754.1 


119 





2 





5 


28 


80 


4 


(0) 




1981 


5,500.0 


66 











1 


23 


39 


3 


(1) 




% Change 
1980 


-43.6 
5,888.9 


-44.5 
159 


. 


-100.0 


- 


-80.0 


-17.9 


-51.3 


-25.0 


(-) 


Fruitland 


1 


-1 


7 


15 


42 


92 


3 


(0) 




1981 


6,518.5 


176 





1 


4 


17 


49 


100 


5 


(2) 




% Change 


+10.7 


+10.7 


-100.0 


_ 


-42.9 


+13.3 


+16.7 


+8.7 


+66.7 


(-) 


Hebron 


1980 


3,571.4 


25 











1 


12 


12 





(6) 




1981 


4,428.6 


30 











3 


14 


13 





(1) 




% Change 


+24.0 


+20.0 


- 


- 


- 


+200.0 


+16.7 


+8.3 


- 


(-83.3) 



123 







55 








a) 

a. 

GC 


a 

.a 
o 
ac 


I^ ID 

a* (/I 

5"5 


c c 

!i X 

i. c 

CO UJ 


c 
_l 1- 


ai 

»— 
> 


c 
o 

I. 


Salisbury 


1980 


11,779.8 


1,926 


6 




3 


37 


8 


449 


1,329 


94 


(16) 




1981 


10,957.8 


1,819 


5 




4 


23 


36 


412 


1,272 


67 


(11) 




% Change 


-7.0 


-5.6 


-16.7 


+33 


.3 


-37.8 


+350.0 


-8.2 


-4.3 


-28.7 


(-31.3) 


Sharptown 


1980 


1,333.3 


8 













1 


4 


3 









1981 


1,142.9 


8 







1 








3 


3 


1 






% Change 


-14.3 





. 




_ 


_ 


-100.0 


-25.0 





_ 




W11 lards 


1980 


2,142.9 


15 













1 


7 


7 





(2) 




1981 


4,400.0 


22 










1 


1 


7 


10 


3 


(1) 




% Change 


+105.3 


+46.7 


. 




- 


. 








+42.9 


. 


(-50.0) 


WORCESTER COUNTY 


























Berlin 


1980 


4,409.1 


97 


1 




1 


1 


9 


25 


59 


1 


(1) 




1981 


3,636.4 


80 










1 


4 


20 


55 





(1) 




% Change 


-17.5 


-17.5 


-100.0 


-100 


.0 





-55.6 


-20.0 


-6.8 


-100.0 


(0) 


Ocean City 


1980 


50,636.4 


2.228 







4 


17 


89 


584 


1.442 


92 


(18) 




1981 


48.355.6 


2,176 


2 




12 


21 


80 


639 


1,348 


74 


(24) 




% Change 


-4.5 


-2.3 


. 


+200 


.0 


+23.5 


-10.1 


+9.4 


-6.5 


-19.6 
1 


(+33.3) 


Ocean Pines 


1980 


5,000.0 


65 













2 


28 


34 






1981 


5,307.7 


69 







1 








22 


44 


2 






% Change 


+6.2 


+6.2 


, 




_ 


_ 


-100.0 


-21.4 


+29.4 


+100.0 




Poconoke City 


1980 


4,930.0 


176 










1 


2 


45 


121 


7 


(0) 




1981 


5,972.2 


215 


1 







3 


3 


46 


135 


27 


(1) 




% Change 


+21.1 


+22.2 


. 




_ 


+200.0 


+50.0 


+2.2 


+11.6 


+285.7 
2 


(-) 


Snow Hill 


1980 


2,136.4 


47 










3 


2 


1 


39 


(1) 




1981 


2.409.1 


53 













3 


1 


49 





(0) 




% Change 


+12.8 


+12.8 


. 




_ 


-100.0 


+50.0 





+25.6 


-100.0 


(-100.0) 


REGION II 


CALVERT COUNTY 


Chesapeake Beach 


1980 


5,251.8 


73 







1 


2 


8 


26 


34 


2 






1981 


1,714.3 


24 













1 


8 


15 









% Change 


-67.4 


-67.1 


. 


-100 


.0 


-100.0 


-87.5 


-69.2 


-55.9 


-100.0 




North Beach 


1980 


5.986.4 


88 







3 





18 


31 


35 


1 


(2) 




1981 


3,600.0 


54 


2 










5 


16 


31 





(1) 




% Change 


-39.9 


-38.6 


. 


-100.0 


. 


-72.2 


-48.4 


-11.4 


-100.0 


(+100.0) 


CHARLES COUNTY 



























Indian Head 


1980 


3,055.6 


55 








1 





10 


36 


8 


(0) 




1981 


4,571.4 


64 










1 





12 


47 


4 


(1) 




i Change 

1980 


+49. f) 
9,016.4 


^16. 4.. 
220 


_ 




. 





7 


+20.0 
37 


+30.6 
163 


-50.0 

11 


(-) 


La Plata 







1 


1 


(4) 




1981 


9,640.0 


241 










3 


8 


23 


203 


4 


(6) 




X Change 


+6.9 


+9.5 


. 


-100.0 


+200.0 


+14.3 


-37.8 


+24.5 


-63.6 


(+50.0) 


ST. MARY'S COUNTY 


























Leonardtown 


1980 


2.857.1 


40 







1 


1 


9 


7 


20 


2 


(2) 




1981 


3,071.4 


43 










1 


4 


13 


22 


3 


(0) 




% Change 


+7.5 


+7.5 


. 


-100.0 





-55.6 


+85.7 


+10.0 


+50.0 


(-100.0) 


REGION III 


ALLEGANY COUNTY 


Barton 


1980 


714.1 


5 
















2 


3 









1981 


166.7 


1 



















1 









X Change 


-76.7 


-80.0 


- 




- 


. 


- 


-100.0 


-66.7 


- 





124 







lis 
ba 


>— c 
•a 0} 
*J ••- 

.2S 


i 




2 

S 


> *- 


^ L- 
CO ui 


c 


> 


c 
1 


Cumberland 


1980 


5,038.5 


1.310 





7 


14 


8 


192 


1.041 


48 






1981 


4,867.4 


1.285 


2 


2 


16 


16 


206 


1.003 


40 


(20) 




% Change 


-3.4 


-1.9 


. 


-71.4 


+ 14.3 


+100.0 


+7.3 


-3.7 


-16.7 


(+81.8) 


Frostburg 


1980 


3,207.8 


247 








2 


10 


47 


181 


7 


(3) 




1981 


4.012.8 


313 





4 


1 


12 


63 


225 


8 


(2) 




* Change 


+25.1 


+26.7 


_ 


. 


-50.0 


+20.0 


+34.0 


+24.3 


♦14.3 


(-33.3) 


Lonaconing 


1980 


571.4 


8 














4 


4 





(1) 




1981 


214.3 


3 














2 


1 





(0) 




% Change 


-62.5 


-62.5 


. 


. 


. 


. 


-50.0 


-75.0 


. 


(-100.0) 


Luke 


1980 


3,000.0 


9 














4 


3 


2 






1981 


4,666.7 


14 











1 


4 


8 


1 






% Change 


+55.6 


+55.6 


. 


. 


. 


. 





+166.7 


-50.0 




Midland 


1980 


500.0 


3 











1 


2 












1981 

































% Change 


-100.0 


-100.0 


. 


- 


- 


-100.0 


-100.0 


. 


. 




Westernport 


1980 


2,925.9 


79 





1 





12 


12 


47 


7 


(1) 




1981 


2,714.3 


76 








3 


14 


25 


33 


1 


(1) 




% Change 


-7.2 


-3.8 


_ 


-100.0 


_ 


+16.7 


+108.3 


-29.8 


-85.7 


(0) 


CARROLL COUNTY 


Hampstead 


1980 


4,692.3 


61 








4 


3 


14 


38 


2 


(2) 




1981 


4,384.6 


57 








2 





18 


36 


1 


(0) 




% Change 


-6.6 


-6.6 


. 


. 


-50.0 


-100.0 


+28.6 


-5.3 


-50.0 


(-100.0) 


Manchester 


1980 


1,388.9 


25 














4 


18 


3 


(0) 




1981 


1,473.7 


28 











2 


7 


19 





(2) 




t Change 


+6.1 


+12.0 


. 


. 


. 


- 


+75.0 


+5.6 


-100.0 


(-) 


*Mt. Airy 


1980 


1,181.8 


26 














13 


11 


2 


(1) 




1981 


880.0 


22 











1 


8 


13 





(0) 




% Change 


-25.5 


-15.4 


_ 


. 


. 


. 


-38.5 


+18.2 


-100.0 


(-100.0) 


New Windsor 


1980 


1,625.0 


13 











3 


6 


4 





(0) 




1981 


1,125.0 


9 














1 


8 





(1) 




% Change 


-30.8 


-30.8 


_ 


. 


. 


-100.0 


-83.3 


+100.0 


- 


(-) 


Sykesville 


1980 


3,176.5 


54 











2 


22 


25 


5 


(1) 




1981 


2,000.0 


34 











2 


9 


21 


2 


(2) 




% Change 


-37.0 


-37.0 


_ 


_ 


. 





-59.1 


-16.0 


-60.0 


(+100.0) 


Taneytown 


1980 


2,230.8 


58 








1 


5 


22 


27 


3 


(0) 




1981 


1,814.8 


49 


1 








7 


18 


21 


2 


(1) 




% Change 


-18.6 


-15.5 


_ 


_ 


-100.0 


+40.0 


-18.2 


-22.2 


-33.2 


(-) 


Union Bridge 


1980 


1,555.6 


14 














7 


5 


2 






1981 


2,222.2 


20 











1 


7 


12 









% Change 


+42.9 


+42.9 


. 


_ 


_ 


_ 





+140.0 


-100.0 




Westminster 


1980 


6,170.5 


543 





4 


4 


29 


116 


373 


17 


(2) 




1981 


4,933.3 


444 





2 


4 


18 


111 


295 


14 


(1) 




% Change 


-20.1 


-18.2 


_ 


-50.0 





-37.9 


-4.3 


-20.9 


-17.6 


(-50.0) 


FREDERICK COUNTY 
























Brunswick 


1980 


4,173 9 


192 





2 


1 


38 


51 


94 


6 


(2) 




1981 


2,500.0 


140 





2 





8 


33 


93 


4 


(1) 




% Change 


-40.1 


-27.1 


. 





-100.0 


-78.9 


-35.3 


-1.1 


-33.3 


(-50.0) 


*A1 though Mt. Airy 


1 ies in Carroll , 


Frederick and 


Howard Counties, 


for purposes of th 


is report. 


we have shown 


the data 


for the entire 


1 city in 


Carroll County. 

























19K 







^0, 

i5 




0) 


at 

s 


1 

o 


t- to 


0) ♦J 

»- c 







01 

■c: 

1 


c 
o 


Burkittsville 


1980 


2.000.0 


4 














3 


1 











1981 


500.0 


1 

















1 











: Change 


-75.0 


-75.0 


. 


. 


. 


- 


-100.0 







_ 




Eiimitsburg 


1980 


1,0'ir 


15 











2 


4 


8 




1 


(1) 




1981 


4,8?:>.0 


78 











5 


13 


56 




4 


(1) 




% Change 


+387.5 


+420.0 


. 


. 


. 


+150.0 


+225.0 


+600.0 


+300 


1.0 


(0) 


Frederick 


1980 


9.163.0 


2.474 


1 


e 


55 


230 


415 


1.675 




92 


(6) 




1981 


9,596.4 


2.639 


1 


2 


63 


215 


608 


1.658 




92 


(17) 




% Change 


+4.7 


+6.7 





-66.7 


+14.5 


-6.5 


+46.5 


-1.0 







(+183.3) 


Hiddletown 


1980 


1,095.2 


23 











2 


8 


10 




3 


(1) 




1981 


2,705.9 


46 





1 





7 


16 


21 




1 


(1) 




% Change 


+147.1 


+100.0 


- 


- 


- 


+250.0 


+100.0 


+110.0 


-66 


i.7 


(0) 


Myersville 


1980 


1,000.0 


5 














2 


2 




1 






1981 


1.500.0 


6 











1 


3 


2 











% Change 


+50.0 


+20.0 


_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


+50.0 





-100 


.0 




Thurmont 


1980 


1,241.4 


36 





1 








8 


24 




3 


(0) 




1981 


1,200.0 


36 











6 


8 


20 




2 


(1) 




'. Change 


-3.3 





- 


-100.0 


- 


. 





-16.7 


-33 


.3 


(-) 


Wa1kersv111e 


1980 


4,136.6 


91 











1 


27 


61 




2 


(2) 




1981 


1,954.6 


43 














13 


30 







(4) 




% Change 


-52.7 


-52.7 


. 


. 


. 


-100.0 


-51.9 


-50.8 


-100 


.0 


(+100.0) 


Woodsboro 


1980 


500.0 


2 

















2 











1981 


200.0 


1 

















1 











% Change 


-60.0 


-50.0 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


-50.0 




- 




GARRETT COUNTY 


Fri ends vi lie 


1980 


666.7 


4 














2 


2 











1981 



































1 Change 


-100.0 


-100.0 


_ 


. 


. 


. 


-100.0 


-100.0 




- 




Grantsvllle 


1980 


8,200.0 


41 











1 


12 


27 




1 


(1) 




1981 


9.400.0 


47 











2 


22 


23 







(0) 




% Change 


+14.6 


+14.6 


. 


. 


. 


+100.0 


+83.3 


-14.8 


-100.0 


(-100.0) 


Mt. Lake Park 


1980 


1,153.9 


15 














5 


10 











1981 


5.250.0 


21 














11 


10 











% Change 


+355.0 


+40.0 


. 


_ 


. 


. 


+120.0 







. 




Oakland 


1980 


4.700.0 


94 








1 


4 


11 


70 




8 


(0) 




1981 


5.200.0 


104 





1 





2 


9 


85 




7 


(1) 




t Change 


+10.6 


+10.6 


. 


_ 


-100.0 


-50.0 


-18.2 


+21.4 


-_-il 


■ 5 


(-) 


WASHINGTON COUNTY 






















Boonsboro 


1980 


894.7 


17 








1 


5 


2 


7 




2 


(2) 




1981 


1.578.9 


30 











1 


6 


20 




3 


(1) 




t Change 


+76.5 


+76.5 


. 


. 


-100.0 


-80.0 


+200.0 


+185.7 


+50.0 


(-50.0) 


Clear Spring 


1980 


1,200.0 


6 














1 


5 







0) 




1981 


3,000.0 


15 














5 


10 







(0) 




I Change 


+150.0 


+150.0 


. 


. 


. 


. 


+400.0 


+100.0 




- 


(-100.0) 


Funkstown 


1980 


1,363.6 


15 











1 


4 


10 











1981 


818.2 


9 











2 


2 


4 




1 






X Change 


-40.0 


-40.0 


- 


- 


- 


+100.0 


-50.0 


-60.0 




.JL_ 





126 









II 


1. 


s 


1 


II 


Breaking 
Entering 


St 


•*- 


< 


Hdqerstiiwn 


lino 


6, 116.0 


2.164 


1 


4 


4' 


145 


595 


1,287 


85 


(59) 




I9li1 


5,948.0 


2,058 


2 


4 


33 


121 


520 


1.309 


69 


(47) 




I Change 


-6.3 


-4.9 
66 


+100.0 





-29.8 




-16.6 
3 


-12.6 


•1.7 


-IB.P, 


f-20.3J 


Hancock 


1980 


3,4/V7 








17 


/■•/i 




':jl 




1981 


?,«94./ 


55 


u 





3 


2 


21 


28 


1 


(1) 




i Change 


-16./ 


-16.7 








1 


.... -IIJ 




'23.5 
2 


-36.4 


-50.0 


(-) 


Sharpsburg 


1980 


1,17^.0 


11 


7 


1 


(0) 




1981 


714. J 


■ 5 














1 


4 





(1) 




t Change 


-48.1 


-54.5 


. 


. 


-100.0 





-50.0 


-42.9 


100.0 


(-) 


Smithsburg 


1980 


2,000.0 


16 











4 


11 


1 


(0) 




1981 


2,000.0 


16 














2 


14 





(2) 




;,; Change 








- 


. 


. 


. 


-50.0 


+27.3 


-100.0 


(-) 


Williamsport 


1980 


5,421.1 


103 











5 


22 


73 


3 


(1) 




1981 


5,631.6 


107 





1 


2 


5 


35 


59 


5 


(3) 




% Change 


+3.9 


+3.9 


. 


. 


_ 





+59.1 


-19.2 


+66.7 


(+200.0) 


REGION IV 
























♦MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
























Chevy Chase IV 


1980 


3,172.4 


92 








1 





41 


50 









1981 


1,586.2 


46 








1 


2 


16 


27 









% Change 


-50.0 


-50.0 


- 


_ 





. 


-61.0 


-46.0 


. 




Chevy Chase Village 


1980 


4,904.8 


103 








3 





39 


61 









1981 


3,428.6 


72 








1 


1 


27 


40 


3 






% Change 


-30.1 


-30.1 


. 


- 


-66.7 


. 


-30.8 


-34.4 


, 




Gaithersburg 


1980 


7,386.7 


1,662 





11 


37 


28 


321 


1,138 


127 






1981 


7,075.8 


1,868 





22 


48 


58 


336 


1,259 


145 






% Change 


-4.2 


+ 12.4 


- 


+100.0 


+29.7 


+107.1 


+4.7 


+10.6 


+14.2 




Garrett Park 


1980 


3,583.3 


43 








1 


1 


24 


16 


1 






1981 


2,333.3 


28 





1 








16 


11 









% Change 
1980 


-34.9 


-34.9 


- 


. 


-100.0 


-100.0 


-33.3 


-31.3 


-100.0 




Kensington 


14,444.4 


260 








6 


3 


74 


161 


16 






1981 


10,333.3 


186 








9 


4 


36 


130 


7 






% Change 


-28.5 


-28.5 


. 


_ 


+50.0 


+33.3 


-51.4 


-19.3 


-56.3 




Pool I'Sv ills 


1980 


2,382.3 


81 











1 


32 


45 


3 






1981 


1,852.9 


63 





1 





4 


14 


38 


6 






% Change 


-22.2 


-22.2 


_ 


_ 


_ 


+300.0 


-56.3 


-15.6 


+100.0 




Rockville 


1980 


5.889.4 


2,556 





14 


52 


90 


600 


1.632 


168 






1981 


5,995.5 


2,644 


1 


14 


81 


71 


527 


1.786 


164 






1 Change 


+1.8 


+3.4 


_ 





+55.8 


-21.1 


-12.2 


+9.4 


-2.4 




Somerset 


1980 


2,363.6 


26 








1 





9 


15 


1 






1981 


1,454.6 


16 








1 





7 


8 









% Change 
1980 


-38.5 


-38.5 


. 


. 





. 


-22.2 


-46.7 


-100.0 




**Takoma Park 


6,396.2 


1,017 


1 


6 


70 


65 


309 


518 


48 






1')81 


6,797.5 


1,108 


2 


10 


112 


27 


333 


570 


54 






% Change 


+6.3 


+8.9 


HOO.O 


+66.7 


+60.0 


-58.5 


+7.8 


+10.0 


+12.5 




***PR. GEORGE'S COUNTY 

























♦Breakdown by Municipality for arson not available from Montgomery County. 
♦♦Although Takoma Park lies in Montgomery and Pr. George's Counties, for purposes of this report, we have shown the data for the entire city in 

Montqomery County. 
'♦♦Because the Pr. George's County Police Department is unable to furnish the Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program with a breakdown of crime 
for the municipalities in their jurisdiction, we are not able to provide crime index information for the cities in Pr. George's County. 



127 



4J 


C7^ C7» 


« 4-> 


c c 






« 3 


^ u 












i- c 


«« «I 


ca llj 



REGION V 



BALTIMORE CITY 



Baltimore City 1980 9,964.8 78,184 216 566 10,046 5,805 17,774 38,116 5,661 (782) 

1981 9,920.0 79,102 228 566 10,737 6,258 18,604 37,378 5,331 (819) 

% Change -.4 +1.2 *S.6 t6.9 +7.8 +4J -1.9 -5.8 (+4.7) 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 



Annapolis 



1980 

1981 

X Change 



8,812.7 

8,710.3 

-1.2 



2,776 

2,796 

+ .7 



24 100 

9 100 

-62.5 



113 

216 

+91.2 



603 1,810 123 (184) 

604 1,710 154 (141) 
_k2 -5.5 +25.2 (-23.4) 



HARFORD COUNTY 



Aberdeen 



1980 

1981 

% Change 



9,504.3 

10,111.1 

+6.4 



1,093 
1,183 
+8.2 



4 32 

7 47 

+75.0 +46.9 



52 

58 

+11.5 



289 

324 

+12.1 



Bel Air 



1980 

1981 

% Change 



7,397.4 

6,240.5 

-15.6 



577 

493 

-14.6 



3 5 

3 10 

+100.0 



Havre de Grace 



1980 

1981 

% Change 



6,738.6 

5,600.0 

-16.9 



593 

504 
-15.0 



5 21 

4 13 

-20.0 -38.1 



20 
19 
-5.0 
24 
24 




99 

77 

-22.2 



684 
711 
+3.9 
423 
366 
-13.5 



32 
34 
+6^3 
27 
18 



(16) 
(16) 



207 

145 

-30.0 



317 

313 

-1.3 



(9) 
(5) 

33. 3 (-44.4) 

19 (12) 

5 (11) 

73.7 (-8.3) 



128 



MARYLAND 
ARREST DATA 



ARREST DATA 



The Maryland Uniform Crime Reporting Program requires the 
submission of monthly reports of data concerning persor ^j arrested in 
the state. A record of total arrest activity for criminal acts in 
both Part I and Part II crime classes is received from 136 county, 
state and municipal law enforcement agencies, according to the age, 
sex and race of persons arrested. Traffic arrests, exci-pt Driving 
While Intoxicated, are not reported. A total of 200,37' arrests for 
Part I and Part II criminal offenses were reported durirg 1981. In 
comparison to 1980, there were 185,252 arrests which results in an 
8.2 percent increase. Based on 1981 population estimates, there 
were 4,702.6 arrests per 100,000 population in Maryland. The arrest 
rate for 1980 was 4,419.2, resulting in a 6.4 percent increase in 
arrest rate. 

A person is counted on the monthly arrest repo^'t each time 
he is arrested. It should be noted that a person may be arrested 
several times during a given month for the same or different offenses. 
This occurs frequently in a crime such as Disorderly Contuct. A juve- 
nile is counted as "arrested" when the circumstances are such that if 
he or she were an adult an arrest would be counted, or wfien police or 
other official action beyond a mere interview, warning or admonish- 
ment is taken. 

Arrest figures do not indicate the number of individuals 
arrested or summonsed since, as has been pointed out, one person may 
be arrested several times during the month. However, arrest infor- 
mation is useful in measuring the extent of law enforcement activi- 
ties in a given geographic area, as well as providing an index for 
measuring the involvement in criminal acts, by the age, sex and race 
of perpetrators. 

30 percent of all reported arrests during 1981 were for 
Part I Offenses (Murder, Manslaughter, Forcible Rape, Rc^bbery, 
Aggravated Assault, Breaking or Entering, Larceny-Theft, and Motor 
Vehicle Theft). Analysis of Part I arrest data indicates that 
Larceny comprised the highest percentage of all arrests for Part I 
crimes, with 50 percent of the total. The same trend -"or Larceny 
occurred in 1980 with 50 percent of the total. The Drug Abuse, 
Driving under the Influence, Disorderly Conduct, and All Other 
Offense categories continue to record the highest percentage of 
arrests for Part II Offenses. These offenses accounted for 67 
percent of the total Part II Offenses in 1981. 

Violent Crihl 

Arrests for crimes of violence (Murder, I'orcible Rape, 
Robbery, and Aggravated Assault) on a statewide bar is amounti^d to 



131 



21 percent of arrests for Part I Offenses and 6 percent of the 
total arrests in 1981, as compared to 20 percent of arrests for 
the Part I Offenses and 6 percent of total arrests in 1980. A 
further evaluation indicates that arrests for Robbery and Aggra- 
vated Assault were the most frequent, representing 44 and 45 per- 
cent respectively of the total arrests for Violent Crimes. 

Property Crime 

Property Crime arrests (Breaking or Entering, Larceny- 
Theft and Motor Vehicle Theft) comprised 79 percent of all arrests 
for Part I Offenses and 24 percent of the total arrests in 1981, 
as compared to 80 percent of all arrests for Part I Offenses and 
26 percent of the total arrests in 1980. 

The highest percentage of Property Crime arrests, 64 
percent, occurred in the Larceny category, the same as in 1980, 
with 63 percent of the total. 



Drug Abuse Violation Arrests 

Information pertaining to Drug Abuse Violation arrests 
is collected according to specific drug categories and whether 
the arrest was for Sale or Manufacture or Possession of the speci- 
fic drug. During 1981, a total of 15,756 arrests for Drug Abuse 
Law Violations was reported, as compared to 1980 with 14,162 
arrests, resulting in an 11.3 percent increase. 

Evaluation of data reported discloses that 44 percent 
of all persons arrested for Drug Abuse Violations were under 21 
years of age. 50 percent of all persons arrested for Drug Abuse 
Violations were under 21 in 1980. 23 percent of the Drug Abuse 
Violation arrests were for persons under the age of 18 as com- 
pared to 27 percent in 1980. 

Analysis of individual categories showed that the high- 
est percentage of arrests, 73 percent, involved marijuana, as 
compared to 76 percent in 1980. 77 percent of the total Drug 
Abuse Arrests were for Possession while 23 percent were for Sale 
or Manufacture. In 1980, 80 percent were for Possession while 
20 percent were for Sale or Manufacture. Possession of Marijuana 
represented 61 percent of the total Drug Abuse arrests, as com- 
pared to 1980 with 65 percent of the total. 



Gambling Arrests 

A total of 620 Gambling arrests were reported during 
1981. In 1980, 720 persons were arrested for Gambling violations, 
resulting in a 14 percent decrease. 



132 



Arrests for Gambling offenses amounted to .3 percent of all 
reported Part I and Part II arrests, compared to .4 percent in 1980. 
Persons under the age of 18 made up 15 percent of all Gambling arrests 
compared to 11 percent in 1980. 



133 



ARRESTS 

JUVENILE 
1981 











7,500 - 










'-- — ■ 1981 


7,000 - 


- 






6,500 - 


- 






6,000 - 


- 






5,500 - 


- 






5,000 - 


- 




r^ ^^"^-"^^Xy^ 


4,500 - 
4,000 - 
3,500 - 

3,000 - 


- 


> 


\ 

4 


2,500 - 


- 







JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT NOV DEC 



134 



ARRESTS 



ADULT 
1981 




JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUNE JULY AUG SEPT OCT MOV DEC 



135 



ARRESTS 



ADULT vs JUVENILE 1981 



75.9% 




venile 



Adult 





5 Yr. 
Total 


1981 


1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


Juveni le 


273,273 


48,298 


51,343 


55,337 


58,737 


59,558 


Adult 


652,080 


152,081 


133,909 


125,405 


118,278 


122,407 



136 



ARRESTS 



DRUG ABUSE VIOLATIONS PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE 1981 



73.5% 



3.6% 



8.2% 



14.7% 




Cocaine 



Marijuana 



■.'•■.•■.•'.•'i Synthetic 



Other 



1977 



Cocaine 
or Opium 


1 

7,i::35 


2,316 


1 ,674 


1,195 


931 


1,119 


Marijuana 


52,293 


11,578 


10,821 


9,344 


10,234 


10,316 


Synthetic 


2,978 


566 


536 


622 


541 


713 


Other 


6,356 


1,296 


1,131 


1,173 


1,227 


1,529 



137 



ARRESTS 

GAMBLING VIOLATIONS 
PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE 1981 



4.4% 



22.7% 



72.9% 




•yyA Bookmaking 



Other 



Bookmaking 


473 


27 


54 


95 


170 


127 


Numbers 


1,285 


141 


177 


248 


315 


404 


Other 


2,772 


452 


489 


665 


450 


716 



138 



ARRESTS 



TTT" 



R A C t 



CLASSIFICATION 
OF OFFENSES 



MALE 



FEMALE 



WHITE 


BLACK 


AMERICAN 
INDIAN 




128 


362 


2 





37 


20 





1 


292 


625 





2 


988 


4.399 


12 


4 


2,813 


2,752 


29 


12 


7.613 


6,656 


34 


18 


13,303 


17,008 


49 


168 


1,504 


1.615 


5 


11 


9.101 


7.146 


63 


54 


598 


248 





1 


619 


791 


3 


5 


2.104 


1.736 


4 


8 


118 


130 


1 


2 


344 


395 





1 


4.181 


1.554 


20 


10 


1.765 


2.016 


27 


17 


347 


339 


3 


1 


848 


469 


3 


3 


8.752 


6.950 


25 


29 


168 


447 


1 


4 


645 


527 


4 





18,017 


3.650 


12 


71 


4.385 


1,306 


22 


9 


6.644 


4.669 


28 


20 


356 


407 


1 





25,344 


18,955 


72 


97 


105 


46 


1 





369 


245 


3 





1 ,896 


547 


8 


5 



Murder * Nonneqliqent 
Manslauqhter 

Manslaughter by 
Neni iqence 



Forcible Rape 

Robbery 

Felonious Assault 

Breaking or Enterinq 

Larceny-Theft 

Motor Vehicle Theft 

Other Assaults 

Arson 

Foraery S Counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen Property; Buying, 
Receiving, Possessing 

Vandal ism 

Weapons; Carrying, 
Possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and 
Commercialized Vice 

Sex Offenses (Except Forcible Rape, 
Prostitution & Commercialized Vice) 

Drug Abuse Violations 

Rambling 

Offenses Against Family 
and Children 

Driving under the Influence 

Liquor Laws 

Disorderly Conduct 

Vagrancy 

All Other Offenses (Except Traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and Loitering 
Law Violations 

Run-Aways 



442 


50 


56 


2 


909 


10 


5,184 


219 


4,788 


818 


13.590 


731 


23,284 


7,244 


2,873 


262 


14,080 


2,284 


728 


119 


981 


437 


2.213 


1,639 


170 


81 


676 


64 


5.240 


525 


3.618 


207 


232 


458 


1,230 


93 


13,347 


2,409 


553 


67 


1.078 


98 


19,612 


2,138 


4,952 


770 


9.687 


1,674 


647 


117 


39,219 


5,249 


134 


18 


458 


159 


1.068 


1,388 



GRAND TOTAL 



171,049 



29,330 



113,384 



86,010 



432 



553 



139 



ARRESTS 



CLASSIFICATION 
Of OFFENSES 



9 i 10-12 

Under 



AGE 
13-14 



A G E 



17 Juvenile 18 
Total 



20 



23 



Morder & Nonnegligent 
Manslaughter 

■bn^ laughter by 
Negligence 



Forcible Rape 

Robbery 

Felonious Assault 

Breaking or Entering 

Larceny-Theft 

Motor Vehicle Theft 

Other Assaults 

Arson 

Forgery S Counterfeiting 

Fraud 

Embezzlement 

Stolen Property; Buying, 
Receiving, Possessing 

Vandalism 

Weapons; Carrying, 
Possessing, etc. 

Prostitution and 
Commercialized Vice 

Sex Offenses (Except Forcible Rape, 
Prostitution S Commercialized Vice) 

Drug Abuse Violations 



Gambling 

Offenses Against Family 
and Children 



Driving under the Influence 

Liguor Laws 

Disorderly Conduct 

Vagrancy 

All Other Offenses (Except Traffic) 

Suspicion 

Curfew and Loitering 
Law Violations 

Run-Aways 
GRAND TOTAL 









7 


10 


20 














1 





15 


35 


23 


41 


23 


88 


390 


397 


550 


44 


108 


252 


235 


304 



226 



68 


28 


40 


32 


2 


4 


1 


2 


60 


39 


40 


38 



417 



370 293 280 182 



371 1,314 277 251 256 



276 253 



1,585 1,306 1,588 1,616 6,772 1.218 



950 710 652 540 



219 
423 



313 1,086 2,729 2,067 2,352 2,593 11,140 2,034 1.662 1,564 1,235 1,082 1,097 



50 

232 

77 



473 















1 








9 


19 


72 





1 


184 


507 


1 


5 



40 



250 318 404 432 1,460 250 204 191 109 118 

558 476 568 734 2,649 758 782 838 853 796 



130 



63 



74 



474 34 



104 66 



85 46 



31 



29 



29 



25 



94 126 155 187 



744 496 503 510 2,952 314 



306 236 



152 175 



172 221 



868 245 210 224 194 179 



302 54 



49 



683 1,072 1.391 3,629 1.194 1,066 1,076 1,053 936 870 



24 



19 



27 



157 



209 626 872 914 1.002 



54 53 
949 1 ,040 



169 393 804 1,004 2,379 485 373 321 



268 223 



267 



317 462 645 1.782 605 645 686 604 572 



34 



56 



55 



55 



180 



502 



33 



4 5 6 13 29 38 

1,295 1,260 1,505 1,534 6,285 1,939 2,179 2,432 2,382 2.168 2.081 

16 12 11 9 54 11 7 19 4 7 6 

124 121 179 142 617 

29 168 767 572 590 330 2,456 

1,184 3,601 10.081 9.089 11.524 12.819 48,298 10,872 10,394 10,376 9,736 8,838 8,412 



140 



ARRESTS 



CLASSIFICATION 
OF OFFENSES 




24 


25-29 


AfiE 
30-34 


35-39 


40-44 


45-49 


50-54 


AGE ■ 
55-59 


60-64 


65 t 

Over 


Adult 
Total 


'~~ 


Murder & Nonnegllqent 




20 


83 


52 


31 


16 


8 


9 


ft 


4 


■j 


424 


492 


Manslaughter 




























Manslaughter by 




5 


8 


9 


13 


2 


1 


3 





1 





56 


58 


Negligence 
































49 


191 


101 


63 


50 


24 


12 


8 


4 


3 


759 


919 


Forcible Rape 
































202 


653 


269 


105 


41 


19 


13 


5 


2 


3 


3.351 


5.403 


Robbery 
































200 


830 


575 


395 


248 


185 


144 


89 


50 


44 


4,292 


5,605 


Felonious Assault 
































420 


1,340 


651 


319 


137 


97 


42 


31 


10 


9 


7,549 


14,321 


Breaking or Entering 
































921 


3,848 


2,423 


1,211 


804 


487 


404 


286 


162 


168 


19,388 


30,528 


Larceny-Theft 
































71 


275 


152 


83 


47 


29 


16 


5 


3 


1 


1,675 


3,135 


Motor Vehicle Theft 
































722 


2,878 


1,957 


1,253 


770 


531 


403 


211 


109 


88 


13,715 


16,364 


Other Assaults 
































10 


82 


42 


31 


8 


14 


13 


3 


6 





373 


847 


Arson 
































75 


322 


247 


111 


61 


45 


27 


19 


5 


6 


1,314 


1,418 


Forgery & Counterfeiting 
































180 


996 


761 


469 


296 


169 


121 


58 


23 


11 


3,767 


3,852 


Fraud 
































n 


64 


43 


16 


14 


14 


3 


2 


1 





232 


251 


Embezzlement 




























Stolen Property; Buying, 




29 


72 


59 


29 


14 


8 


9 


6 


3 


2 


433 


740 


Receiving, Possessing 
































162 


518 


289 


181 


107 


69 


46 


19 


18 


11 


2,813 


5,765 


Vandalism 




























Weapons; Carrying, 




139 


600 


381 


210 


139 


92 


73 


60 


30 


24 


2,957 


3,825 


Possessing, etc. 




























Prostitution and 




44 


138 


98 


38 


26 


14 


18 


10 


3 


5 


660 


690 


Commercialized Vice 




























Sex Offenses (Except Forcible 


Rape, 


42 


197 


137 


102 


55 


40 


50 


21 


18 


16 


1,021 


1,323 


Prostitution & Commercialized 


Vice) 




























760 


2,703 


1,373 


572 


256 


132 


75 


36 


16 


9 


12,127 


15,756 


Drug Abuse Violations 
































21 


85 


68 


46 


43 


34 


39 


29 


15 


19 


526 


620 


Gambling 




























Offenses Against Family 




45 


280 


233 


172 


105 


59 


20 


18 


7 


3 


1,170 


1,176 


and Children 
































944 


3,854 


3,060 


2,275 


1,800 


1,399 


1,183 


810 


461 


352 


21,541 


21,750 


Driving under the Influence 
































155 


479 


260 


170 


124 


104 


95 


52 


33 


21 


3,343 


5,722 


Liquor Laws 
































463 


1,635 


1,194 


708 


626 


480 


356 


263 


142 


98 


9,579 


11,361 


Disorderly Conduct 
































33 


157 


100 


37 


40 


39 


30 


13 


8 


7 


735 


764 


Vagrancy 




























All Other Offenses (Except Ti 


raffic) 


1,958 


7,759 


5,565 


3,437 


2,153 


1,426 


1,121 


845 


366 


372 


38,183 


44,468 






1 


20 


7 


7 


3 


2 


1 


2 





1 


98 


152 


Suspicion 




























Curfew and Loitering 





































617 


Law Violation 

































































2,456 



Run-Aways 



GRAND TOTAL 



A «(; ? 907 1 499 1,276 152,081 200.379 

7,682 30,067 20,106 12,084 7,985 5,521 4,326 2,907 



141 



TABLES FOR ARRESTS BY REGION, COUNTY, AND 
AGENCY ARE CONTAINED IN THE SUPPLEMENT REPORT 
"MARYLAND ARREST DATA" 



142 



LAW 

ENFORCEMENT 

EMPLOYEE DATA 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS KILLED 



Two law enforcement officers were killed in Maryland during 
1981. The following summaries are based on information provided by 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation who conducts in-depth investigations 
into these tragic incidents in which law enforcement officers have made 
the supreme sacrifice in the performance of their duties. 



MARCH 27, 1981 

A 9-year veteran officer with the Montgomery County Depart- 
ment of Police was shot and killed at approximately 7:00 A.M. on March 27 
after responding to a burglar alarm at a department store in Silver Spring 
Upon his arrival at the store, the 33-year-old officer was joined by the 
assistant store manager and an alarm company security officer. The three 
entered the store and proceeded to a locked office containing two safes. 
After entering the room, the victim was shot at close range by a suspect 
utilizing a .38-caliber handgun. A second suspect then appeared and 
shot the security officer twice in the chest, killing him. After the 
assistant manager, also severely wounded, was forced to open the two 
safes, the victim officer was then struck several times about the head 
and shot a second time. He suffered gunshot wounds to the back of the 
head and the left shoulder. The burglary suspects fled the shooting 
scene with approximately $7,000 in cash and the victim's service weapon. 
Following an extensive investigation, five males--two aged 29 and the 
others aged 25, 23 and 22--were arrested and charged with the murders. 



JULY 20, 1981 

At approximately 11:45 P.M. on July 20, a Baltimore Police 
Department officer, 28 years of age, was handling a traffic accident 
in a downtown area when he was attacked and killed. A 21-year-old 
male allegedly came out of the crowd that had gathered at the accident 
site, grabbed the officer from behind, and threw him to the ground. 
Reportedly, he then took the victim's .38-caliber service weapon and 
at point-blank range shot the officer in the head and abdomen. During 
the attack, no one emerged from the crowd to assist the officer. The 
suspect was arrested about 5 hours later and charged with murder. The 
victim officer had over 7 years of law enforcement experience. 



145 



LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS ASSAULTED 



The following information is based on a detailed monthly 
collection of data in the Uniform Crime Reporting System regarding 
the problem of assaults on local, county and state law enforcement 
officers. The large number of reported assaults on sworn officers 
is in part due to a prevalent attitude of disrespect for law enforce- 
ment in certain elements of our society. 

A total of 3,513 law enforcement officers in Maryland were 
victims of assault in the line of duty during 1981, as compared to 
3,452 assaults during 1980, resulting in a 1.8 percent increase. 

The rate of assaults on law enforcement officers for the 
state was 32 assaults for e'^ery 100 sworn officers, as compared to 
31 assaults per 100 sworn officers in 1980. 

Physical force was used in 86.3 percent of all assaults 
on pol ice officers. 

The greatest number of assaults (1,311) or 37.3 percent 
occurred while officers were responding to disturbance calls (fami- 
ly disputes, man with a gun, etc.). 33 percent of assaults on 
police officers occurred between 10:00 P.M. and 2:00 A.M. 

A total of 3,460 assaults on law enforcement officers 
were cleared during 1981, amounting to a 98.5 percent clearance 
rate, the same as in 1980. 



147 



POLICE ASSAULTED 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY TYPE 1981 



86 . 3% 




Fi rearm 



Physical Force 



Fi rearm 


665 


150 


132 


133 


103 


147 


Knife 


522 


84 


102 


117 


103 


116 


Other 


1,452 


248 


300 


253 


343 


308 


Physical 
Force 


14,024 


3,031 


2,918 


2,836 


2,475 


2,764 



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149 



POLICE ASSAULTED 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION OF INJURIES vs NON-INJURIES 1981 



81 . 3% 



18.7% 




:•:•:•:! Personal Injury 



No Personal 
Injury 





5 Yr. 
Total 


1981 


1980 


1979 


1978 


1977 


No Personal 
Injury 


13,006 


2,855 


2,736 


2,600 


2,?83 


2,532 


Personal 

Injury 


3,667 


658 


716 


739 


741 


803 



150 



POLICE ASSAULTED 



PERCENT DISTRIBUTION BY TIME OF DAY 



1981 



:rcent 




151 



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i 
I 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



Police Employee Data 

The Uniform Crime Reporting Program in Maryland incorpo- 
rates the collection of pertinent data relating to the police of 
the State. Information regarding police employee strength is dis- 
cussed in this section. 

This information is submitted by county, municipal, and 
state law enforcement agencies and compiled on an annual basis. 
Specific information concerning the number of law enforcement em- 
ployees reflects the status as of October 31, 1981. 

Law Enforcement Employee Rates 

In 1981, the average number of full-time law enforcement 
employees (county, municipal and state) including civilian employees, 
amounted to 3.2 for each 1,000 inhabitants of the State. The rate 
based on sworn personnel only (excluding civilians), amounted to 
2.6 per 1,000 population. In 1980, the average number of full-time 
law enforcement employees amounted to 3.3 for each 1,000 inhabitants 
and 2.7 sworn personnel per 1,000 inhabitants of the State. There 
was a 3 percent decrease in the average number of law enforcement 
employees and a 4 percent decrease in the average number of sworn 
personnel . 

The ratio of law enforcement employees per 1,000 popula- 
tion in any given area or municipality is influenced by a number 
of factors, much the same as the crime rate. The determination of 
law enforcement strength for a given county or municipality is based 
on factors such as population density, size and character of the 
community, geographic location, proximity to metropolitan areas, 
and other conditions which exist in the area generating the need 
for law enforcement services. Employee rates also differ among 
agencies since, in particular, there is a wide variation in the 
responsibilities and level of activity within various law enforce- 
ment agencies. The information in this section relates to reported 
police employee strength and should not be interpreted as recommended 
strength for any area. 

Civilian Employees 

The personnel of each law enforcement agency differ as to 
the demands and responsibilities placed before them. Many police 
officers are fully occupied with clerical tasks and are not free to 
perform active police duties. Some police administrators use civi- 
lians in this capacity, thus freeing the sworn personnel for actual 
police related services. 



163 



As of October 31, 1981, 2,702 or 20 percent of the total 
number of police employees in Maryland were civilians, as compared 
to 2,717 or 19 percent in 1980. 



Municipalities 

As of October 31, 1981, municipal police departments 
reported a total of 4,947 employees. This represents a rate of 
4.0 police employees per 1,000 population and a rate of 3.3 sworn 
personnel per 1,000 population, as compared to 4.1 police employees 
per 1,000 population in 1980, and a 3.5 sworn personnel rate per 
1,000 population. There were 4,157 sworn officers and 790 civilian 
employees in 1981, as compared to 4,282 sworn officers and 786 civi- 
lians in 1980. The sworn personnel represents 84 percent of the 
total employees and the civilians 16 percent, the same percentage 
as in 1980. 

Counties 

This category includes data from County Police Departments, 
Sheriff's Departments and State Police. Combined, they reported as 
of October 31, 1981, a total of 7,427 police employees. This amounts 
to a ratio of 2.5 police employees per 1,000 population and a ratio 
of 1.9 sworn personnel per 1,000 population, as compared to 2.5 police 
employees per 1,000 population and 2.0 sworn personnel per 1,000 popu- 
lation for 1980. There were 5,799 sworn personnel and 1,628 civilian 
personnel. The sworn personnel represent 78 percent of the total, 
and the civilians 22 percent, the same as in 1980. 

The Parks, Tolls, College and University Police accounted 
for 1,411 sworn and civilian police employees. This represents 10 
percent of the total police employees. These figures are not in- 
cluded in the above statistics of municipal and county categories. 

Any attempt to break down the categories above (County 
Police Departments, Sheriff's Departments and State Police) on a 
statewide basis would be misleading as they have overlapping and 
concurrent jurisdiction in many areas. Therefore, these categories 
have been combined in order to represent the best possible ratios 
of police employees to the current population. 



164 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE RATES 



REGION I 



NUMBER *RATE 



981 


3.3 


50 


2.1 


186 


3.3 


81 


2.6 


37 


2.2 


57 


2.2 


55 


2.8 


106 


4.1 


196 


3.0 


213 


6.9 



Carol ine County 
Cecil County 
Dorchester County 
Kent County 
Queen Anne's County 
Somerset County 
Talbot County 
Wicomico County 
Worcester County 



REGION II 344 2.0 

Calvert County 62 1.8 

Charles County 187 2.5 

St. Mary's County 95 1.6 



REGION III 926 2.1 

Allegany County 216 2.6 

Carroll County 171 1.8 

Frederick County 254 2.2 

Garrett County 46 1.7 

Washington County 239 2.1 



REGION IV 2,913 2.3 

Montgomery County 1,194 2.0 

Pr. George's County 1,719 2.6 



REGION V 7,899 3.8 

Baltimore City 3,853 4.8 

Anne Arundel County 962 2.6 

Baltimore County 2,400 3.6 

Harford County 320 2.2 

Howard County 364 3.0 

PARKS 722 

STATE TOTAL 13,785 3.2 
^Rate per 1,000 population 

165 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



REGION 1 
CAROLINE COUNTY 

Denton 

Federal sburg 
Goldsboro 
Greensboro 
Mary del 
Preston 
Ridgely 

Sheriff's Dept, 
State Police 





NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 


)TAL 


SWORN 


Cj VI LI AN 


MALE 


FEMALE 


}8] 


761 


220 


H3/ 


144 


50 


43 


7 


47 


3 


7 


7 





7 





5 


5 





5 





1 


1 





1 





3 


3 





3 





1 


1 





1 





2 


2 





2 





2 


2 





2 





16 


9 


7 


14 


2 


13 


13 





12 


1 



CECIl COUNTY 

Chesapeake City 
Elkton 
North East 
Port Deposit 
Rising Sun 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 



186 

1 

20 
5 
2 
4 

40 
114 



150 

1 

16 

4 

2 

2 

30 

95 



36 


4 
1 

2 
10 
19 



157 

1 

16 

4 

2 

2 

31 

101 



29 


4 
1 

2 
9 
13 



DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Cambridge 
Hurlock 

Sheriff's Dept. 
State Pol ice 



81 

38 

5 

25 

13 



61 

30 

5 

13 

13 



20 

8 



12 





75 

33 

5 
24 
13 



KENT COUNTY 

Chestertown 
Rock Hall 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 



37 

9 

3 

18 

7 



28 



7 

3 
11 



2 

7 




31 

7 

3 

14 

7 



2 



4 




QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 57 

Centreville 6 

Sheriff's Dept. 11 

State Pol ice 40 



49 

6 
11 
32 



48 

6 
11 
31 



166 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
SWORN CIVILIAN MALE FEMALE 



SOMERSET COUNTY 



55 



50 



47 



Crisfield 
Princess Anne 
UMES 

Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 



12 
3 
11 
15 
14 



8 

3 

10 

15 

14 



8 

3 

9 

13 

14 



TALBOT COUNTY 



106 



79 



27 



86 



20 



Easton 

Oxford 

St. Michaels 

Sheriff's Dept. 

State Police 


29 
2 
7 

16 

52 


21 

2 

6 

10 

40 


8 

1 
6 
12 


22 

2 

5 

13 

44 


7 

2 
3 
8 


WICOMICO COUNTY 


196 


155 


41 


176 


20 


Del mar 

Fruitland 

Salisbury 

Salisbury St. College 

Sheriff's Dept. 

State Police 


6 

4 

58 
16 
20 
92 


5 
4 
49 
12 
17 
68 


1 

9 
4 
3 
24 


5 
4 

50 
14 
18 
85 


1 

8 
2 
2 
7 


WORCESTER COUNTY 


213 


146 


67 


170 


43 


Berlin 
Ocean City 
Ocean Pines 
Pocomoke City 
Snow Hill 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 


8 
98 
14 
15 

7 
37 
34 


5 
75 
10 
11 

6 
14 
25 


3 

23 

4 

4 

1 

23 

9 


5 
78 
11 
11 

6 
32 
27 


3 

20 

3 

4 

1 
5 
7 


REGION II 


344 


285 


59 


301 


43 


CALVERT COUNTY 


62 


59 


3 


58 


4 


North Beach 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 


5 
18 

39 


5 
16 
38 



2 
1 


5 
16 
37 



2 
2 



167 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



NUMBER 
SWORN 



NUMBER 
CIVILIAN 



NUMBER 
MALE 



NUMBER 
FEMALE 



CHARLES COUNTY 



187 



151 



36 



161 



26 



La Plata 


1 


1 





1 





Sheriff's Dept. 


109 


96 


13 


94 


15 


State Police 


77 


54 


23 


66 


11 



ST. MARY'S COUNTY 



95 



75 



20 



82 



13 



St. Mary's College 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 


8 
44 
43 


8 
32 
35 




12 

8 


8 
38 
36 



6 
7 


REGION III 


926 


722 


204 


810 


116 


ALLEGANY COUNTY 


216 


174 


42 


188 


28 


Cumberland 

Frostburg 

Frostburg St. College 

Lonaconing 

Luke 


65 

17 

17 

2 

2 


57 

14 

16 

2 

2 


8 
3 

1 




63 

16 

14 

2 

2 


2 

1 
3 




Westernport 
Sheriff's Dept. 
State's Att. Office 
State Police 


8 
37 

8 

60 


8 
25 

2 
48 



12 

6 
12 


5 
26 

5 
55 


3 

11 

3 

5 



CARROLL COUNTY 



171 



136 



35 



152 



19 



Hampstead 


2 


2 





2 





Manchester 


2 


2 





2 





Sykesville 


6 


5 


1 


5 


1 


Taneytown 


6 


5 


1 


5 


1 


Westminster 


24 


19 


5 


19 


5 


Sheriff's Dept. 


40 


26 


14 


37 


3 


State Police 


91 


77 


14 


82 


9 


FREDERICK COUNTY 


254 


189 


65 


218 


36 


Brunswick 


8 


7 


1 


7 


1 


Emmitsburg 


3 


3 





3 





Frederick 


83 


72 


11 


67 


16 


Thunnont 


4 


4 





4 






168 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



NUMBER 
SWORN 



NUMBER 
CIVILIAN 



NUMBER 
MALE 



NUMBER 
FEMALE 



FREDERICK COUNTY 
(Cont'd) 

Sheriff's Dept. 
State Police 



65 
91 



32 
71 



33 
20 



51 
86 



14 
5 



GARRETT COUNTY 



46 



43 



41 



Grantsvil le 


1 


1 





1 





Oakland 


7 


5 


2 


5 


2 


Sheriff's Dept. 


21 


20 


1 


18 


3 


State Police 


17 


17 





17 





WASHINGTON COUNTY 


239 


180 


59 


211 


28 


Boonsboro 


2 


2 





2 





Hagerstown 


111 


95 


16 


97 


14 


Hancock 


3 


3 





3 





Smi thsburg 


1 


1 





1 





Williamsport 


3 


3 





3 





Sheriff's Dept. 


57 


26 


31 


49 


8 


State Police 


62 


50 


12 


56 


6 


REGION IV 


2,913 


2,291 


622 


2,343 


570 


MONTGOMERY COUNTY 


1,194 


954 


240 


949 


245 


Chevy Chase 


9 


8 


1 


7 


2 


Gaithersburg 


7 


6 


1 


5 


2 


Md. Nat. Cap. Park 


61 


49 


12 


52 


9 


Montgomery County 


921 


728 


193 


730 


191 


Rockville 


38 


26 


12 


27 


11 


Takoma Park 


37 


30 


7 


27 


10 


Sheriff's Dept. 


74 


68 


6 


62 


12 


State Police 


47 


39 


8 


39 


8 



PR. GEORGE'S COUNTY 1,719 

Berwyn Heights 

Bladensburg 

Bowie State College 

Capitol Heights 

Cheverly 

Colmar Manor 

Cottage City 



1,337 



382 



1,394 



325 



1 


1 





1 





17 


11 


6 


10 


7 


15 


12 


3 


11 


4 


1 


1 





1 





8 


8 





8 





4 


3 


1 


1 


3 


7 


6 


1 


7 






169 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 







NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 


NUMBER 




TOTAL 


SWORN 


CIVILIAN 


MALE 


FEMALE 


PR. GEORGE'S COUNTY 












(Cont'd) 












District Heights 


8 


7 


1 


7 


1 


Edmonston 


2 


2 





2 





Fairmount Heights 


1 


1 





1 





Forest Heights 


6 


5 


1 


4 


2 


Glenarden 


3 


2 


1 


2 


1 


Greenbel t 


34 


28 


6 


31 


3 


Hyattsville 


28 


20 


8 


21 


7 


Landover Hills 


1 


1 





1 





Laurel 


38 


27 


11 


29 


9 


Md. Nat. Cap. Park 


63 


53 


10 


50 


13 


Morning side 


1 


1 





1 





Mt . Ra i n i e r 


13 


9 


4 


11 


2 


Pr. George's Co. 


1,092 


834 


258 


881 


211 


Riverdale 


11 


7 


4 


8 


3 


Univ. of Md.-C.P. 


78 


62 


16 


65 


13 


University Park 


7 


7 





7 





Upper Marlboro 


1 


1 





1 





Sheriff's Dept. 


148 


125 


23 


120 


28 


State Police 


131 


103 


28 


113 


18 


REGION V 


7,899 


6,495 


1,404 


6,581 


1,318 


BALTIMORE CITY 


3,853 


3,273 


580 


3,276 


577 


Baltimore City 


3,591 


3,032 


559 


3,046 


545 


Coppin St. Univ. 


18 


17 


1 


15 


3 


Morgan State Univ. 


29 


28 


1 


24 


5 


Univ. of Balto. 


13 


9 


4 


10 


3 


UMAB 


68 


59 


9 


57 


n 


Sheriff's Dept. 


122 


117 


5 


113 


9 


State Police 


12 


11 


1 


11 


1 



ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 



962 



744 



218 



810 



152 



Annapol is 


120 


98 


22 


90 


30 


Anne Arundel Co. 


586 


423 


163 


498 


88 


Sheriff's Dept. 


24 


24 





22 


2 


State Police 


232 


199 


33 


200 


32 


BALTIMORE COUNTY 


2,400 


1,934 


466 


1,942 


458 


Baltimore Co. 


1,486 


1,342 


144 


1,300 


186 


Md. Port Admin. 


11 


73 


4 


65 


12 


Sparrows Point 


157 


147 


10 


143 


14 



170 



LAW ENFORCEMENT EMPLOYEE DATA 



TOTAL 



BALTIMORE COUNTY 




(Cont'd) 




Towson State Univ. 


31 


UMBC 


27 


Sheriff's Dept. 


38 


State Police 


584 



NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER NUMBER 
SWORN CIVILIAN MALE FEMALE 



24 


7 


20 


n 


19 


8 


22 


5 


35 


3 


32 


6 


294 


290 


360 


224 



HARFORD COUNTY 



320 



282 



38 



264 



56 



Aberdeen 


35 


29 


6 


28 


7 


Bel Air 


29 


23 


6 


24 


5 


Havre de Grace 


24 


20 


4 


19 


5 


Sheriff's Dept. 


133 


133 





108 


25 


State Police 


99 


77 


22 


85 


14 



HOWARD COUNTY 



364 



262 



102 



289 



75 



Howard County 


233 


180 


53 


185 


48 


Sheriff's Dept. 


19 


16 


3 


14 


5 


State Police 


112 


66 


46 


90 


22 



PARKS & TOLLS 



722 



529 



193 



642 



80 



Md. Alcohol Tax Enf. 
Md. Park Service 
Md. Toll Facilities 
Natural Resources 
State Fire Marshal 



14 


13 


1 


13 


1 


243 


119 


124 


219 


24 


188 


167 


21 


161 


27 


232 


201 


31 


215 


17 


45 


29 


16 


34 


11 



MARYLAND TOTALS 



13,785 11,083 2,702 11,514 2,271 



171 



r^r^ TKT-r-n ----T^r^^TT ATE 



UNIV OF MD COLLEGF PARK 



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